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Globalisation and the Dutch economy; a case study to the influence of the emergence of China and Eastern Europe on Dutch international trade

  • Henri de Groot

    ()

  • Jessie Bakens

This paper investigates the impact of the emergence of China and Eastern Europe as increasingly important players on the world market for a small open economy such as the Netherlands. We describe and compare in detail revealed comparative advantages across the different country groups. This allows us to characterize the sectors in the Dutch economy that are most likely to experience enhanced competition in the face of globalization. This analysis is complemented with a gravity analysis that adds a second dimension to the competitive impact, viz. the extent to which markets are localized as opposed to global. We conclude that the overlap in revealed comparative advantages between China and the Netherlands is limited. The major impact of the emergence of China for Dutch trade is that it is likely to foster the position of the Netherlands as a gateway to Europe. Furthermore, we show that the overlap in comparative advantage between China and Eastern Europe is relatively large, implying that competition from Eastern Europe are likely to be stronger than from China.

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Paper provided by CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis in its series CPB Discussion Paper with number 89.

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Date of creation: Nov 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:89
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  1. Rodrik, Dani, 2006. "What's So Special about China's Exports?," Working Paper Series rwp06-001, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  2. Alan V. Deardorff, 1995. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade: Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," NBER Working Papers 5377, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Guillaume Gaulier & Françoise Lemoine & Deniz Ünal, 2006. "China’s Emergence and the Reorganisation of Trade Flows in Asia," Working Papers 2006-05, CEPII research center.
  4. F. Gerard Adams & Byron Gangnes & Yochanan Shachmurove, 2004. "Why Is China So Competitive? Measuring and Explaining China’s Competitiveness," Working Papers 200406, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  5. Peter K. Schott, 2006. "The Relative Sophistication of Chinese Exports," NBER Working Papers 12173, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Robert C. Feenstra, 1999. "Discrepancies in International Data: An Application to China-Hong Kong Entrepot Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 338-343, May.
  7. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2004. "Trade Costs," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 593, Boston College Department of Economics.
  8. Keld Laursen, 1998. "Revealed Comparative Advantage and the Alternatives as Measures of International Specialisation," DRUID Working Papers 98-30, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  9. Anderson, James E, 1979. "A Theoretical Foundation for the Gravity Equation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 106-16, March.
  10. J. David Richardson & Chi Zhang, 1999. "Revealing Comparative Advantage: Chaotic or Coherent Patterns Across Time and Sector and U.S. Trading Partner?," NBER Working Papers 7212, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Thomas Vollrath, 1991. "A theoretical evaluation of alternative trade intensity measures of revealed comparative advantage," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 265-280, June.
  12. Guillaume Gaulier & Françoise Lemoine & Deniz Ünal-Kesenci, 2005. "China’s Integration in East Asia: Production Sharing, FDI & High-Tech Trade," Working Papers 2005-09, CEPII research center.
  13. Deardoff, A.V., 1995. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade: Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," Working Papers 382, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  14. Barry Eichengreen & Yeongseop Rhee & Hui Tong, 2004. "The Impact of China on the Exports of Other Asian Countries," NBER Working Papers 10768, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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