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Las Consecuencias Económicas De Un Nombre Atípico. El Caso Colombiano

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  • Alejandro Gaviria

    ()

  • Carlos Medina
  • María del Mar Palau

    ()

Abstract

Este artículo examina las consecuencias sobre los ingresos laborales de tener un nombre atípico para el caso colombiano. La primera parte del artículo muestra que los jóvenes, hijos de padres no educados, habitantes de zonas rurales y pertenecientes a minorías étnicas tienen una mayor probabilidad de tener un nombre atípico. La segunda parte muestra que el impacto de un nombre atípico sobre los salarios es sustancial (superior al 10%) y que el mismo es mucho mayor para las personas educadas que para los no educadas. Los resultados sugieren la existencia de mecanismos de transmisión intergeneracional alternativos a los tradicionales (restricciones de crédito, herencias, etc.). En Colombia, al menos, los nombres atípicos son no sólo una consecuencia de las desigualdades sociales, sino también una causa de las mismas.

Suggested Citation

  • Alejandro Gaviria & Carlos Medina & María del Mar Palau, 2007. "Las Consecuencias Económicas De Un Nombre Atípico. El Caso Colombiano," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 003108, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:003108
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    File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/6d21d2007-09.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roland G. Fryer, Jr., 2006. "A Model of Social Interactions and Endogenous Poverty Traps," NBER Working Papers 12364, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Fogel, Robert William, 2000. "The Fourth Great Awakening and the Future of Egalitarianism," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226256627, July.
    3. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    4. Cecilia Rouse & Claudia Goldin, 2000. "Orchestrating Impartiality: The Impact of "Blind" Auditions on Female Musicians," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 715-741, September.
    5. Roland G. Fryer, Jr. & Paul Torelli, 2005. "An Empirical Analysis of 'Acting White'," NBER Working Papers 11334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jere R. Behrman & Yingmei Cheng & Petra E. Todd, 2004. "Evaluating Preschool Programs When Length of Exposure to the Program Varies: A Nonparametric Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 108-132, February.
    7. Alejandro Gaviria Uribe, 2001. "¿Quiénes soportan la carga del crimen en Colombia?," COYUNTURA ECONÓMICA, FEDESARROLLO, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jose A. Martinez, 2013. "Do names matter? The influence of names on perception about professionals in Spain," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 2(2), pages 66-74.
    2. Francisco Galarza & Liuba Kogan & Gustavo Yamada, 2011. "¿Existe discriminación en el mercado laboral de Lima Metropolitana? : un análisis experimental," Working Papers 11-15, Centro de Investigación, Universidad del Pacífico.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    atípicos sin tocayo salarios exclusión social;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection

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