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Las Consecuencias Económicas De Un Nombre Atípico. El Caso Colombiano

  • Alejandro Gaviria


  • Carlos Medina
  • María del Mar Palau


Este artículo examina las consecuencias sobre los ingresos laborales de tener un nombre atípico para el caso colombiano. La primera parte del artículo muestra que los jóvenes, hijos de padres no educados, habitantes de zonas rurales y pertenecientes a minorías étnicas tienen una mayor probabilidad de tener un nombre atípico. La segunda parte muestra que el impacto de un nombre atípico sobre los salarios es sustancial (superior al 10%) y que el mismo es mucho mayor para las personas educadas que para los no educadas. Los resultados sugieren la existencia de mecanismos de transmisión intergeneracional alternativos a los tradicionales (restricciones de crédito, herencias, etc.). En Colombia, al menos, los nombres atípicos son no sólo una consecuencia de las desigualdades sociales, sino también una causa de las mismas.

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Paper provided by UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE in its series DOCUMENTOS CEDE with number 003108.

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Length: 31
Date of creation: 10 May 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:col:000089:003108
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  2. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2003. "Are emily and greg more employable than lakisha and jamal? A field experiment on labor market discrimination," Natural Field Experiments 00216, The Field Experiments Website.
  3. Jere R. Behrman & Yingmei Cheng & Petra E. Todd, 2004. "Evaluating Preschool Programs When Length of Exposure to the Program Varies: A Nonparametric Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 108-132, February.
  4. Fogel, Robert William, 2000. "The Fourth Great Awakening and the Future of Egalitarianism," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226256627.
  5. Roland G. Fryer, Jr., 2006. "A Model of Social Interactions and Endogenous Poverty Traps," NBER Working Papers 12364, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Roland G. Fryer, Jr. & Paul Torelli, 2005. "An Empirical Analysis of 'Acting White'," NBER Working Papers 11334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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