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Stock Grants as Commitment Device

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  • Gian Luca Clementi
  • Thomas F. Cooley
  • Cheng Wang

Abstract

A large and increasing fraction of the value of executives' compensation is accounted for by security grants. It is often argued that the optimal compensation contracts characterized in the theoretical literature can be implemented by means of stock or option grants. However, in most cases the optimal allocation can be implemented simply by a contingent sequence of cash payments. Security awards are redundant. In this paper we develop a dynamic model of managerial compensation where neither the firm nor the manager can commit to long-term contracts. We show that, in this environment, if stock grants are not used, then the optimal contract collapses to a series of short term contracts. When stock grants are used, however, nonlinear intertemporal schemes can be implemented to achieve better risk-sharing and larger firm value.

Suggested Citation

  • Gian Luca Clementi & Thomas F. Cooley & Cheng Wang, "undated". "Stock Grants as Commitment Device," GSIA Working Papers 2002-E12, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:cmu:gsiawp:1025802450
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan Thomas & Tim Worrall, 1988. "Self-Enforcing Wage Contracts," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(4), pages 541-554.
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    14. M. Imtiaz Mazumder & Nazneen Ahmad, 2010. "Greed, financial innovation or laxity of regulation?: A close look into the 2007-2009 financial crisis and stock market volatility," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(2), pages 110-134, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lustig, Hanno & Syverson, Chad & Van Nieuwerburgh, Stijn, 2011. "Technological change and the growing inequality in managerial compensation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 601-627, March.
    2. Gian Luca Clementi & Thomas Cooley, 2009. "Executive Compensation: Facts," Working Papers 09-16, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    3. Vincenzo Quadrini & Ramon Marimon & Thomas Cooley, 2012. "Risky Investments with Limited Commitment," 2012 Meeting Papers 603, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Amal Hili & Didier Laussel & Ngo Van Long, 2016. "Disentangling Managerial Incentives from a Dynamic Perspective: The Role of Stock Grants," CESifo Working Paper Series 6083, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Mele, Antonio, 2014. "Repeated moral hazard and recursive Lagrangeans," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 69-85.
    6. Gian Luca Clementi & Thomas Cooley & Sonia Di Giannatale, 2010. "A Theory of Firm Decline," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(4), pages 861-885, October.
    7. Arantxa Jarque, 2008. "Optimal CEO compensation and stock options," Working Papers. Serie EC 2008-04, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    8. Arantxa Jarque, 2008. "CEO compensation : trends, market changes, and regulation," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 265-300.
    9. M. Imtiaz Mazumder & Nazneen Ahmad, 2010. "Greed, financial innovation or laxity of regulation?: A close look into the 2007-2009 financial crisis and stock market volatility," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(2), pages 110-134, June.
    10. Jarque, Arantxa, 2014. "The Complexity of CEO Compensation," Working Paper 14-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    11. Jarque, Arantxa & John, Muth, 2013. "Evaluating Executive Compensation Packages," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 4Q, pages 251-285.

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