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Double Bubbles in Assets Markets with Multiple Generations

  • Cary Deck

    (Department of Economics, Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas)

  • David Porter

    (Economic Science Institute, Chapman University)

  • Vernon L. Smith

    (Economic Science Institute, Chapman University)

We construct an asset market in a finite horizon overlapping-generations environment. Subjects are tested for comprehension of their fundamental value exchange environment, and then reminded during each of 25 periods of its declining new value. We observe price bubbles forming when new generations enter the market with additional liquidity and bursting as old generations exit the market and withdrawing cash. The entry and exit of traders in the market creates an M shaped double bubble price path over the life of the traded asset. This finding is significant in documenting that bubbles can reoccur within one extended trading horizon and, consistent with previous cross-subject comparisons, shows how fluctuations in market liquidity influence price paths. We also find that trading experience leads to price expectations that incorporate fundamental value.

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File URL: http://www.chapman.edu/ESI/wp/Deck-Porter-Smith_DoubleBubbles.pdf
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Paper provided by Chapman University, Economic Science Institute in its series Working Papers with number 11-10.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chu:wpaper:11-10
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  1. Charles Noussair & Stephane Robin & Bernard Ruffieux, 2001. "Price Bubbles in Laboratory Asset Markets with Constant Fundamental Values," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 87-105, June.
  2. Sunder, S., 1992. "Experimental Asset Markets: A Survey," GSIA Working Papers 1992-19, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  3. Jürgen Huber & Michael Kirchler, 2012. "The impact of instructions and procedure on reducing confusion and bubbles in experimental asset markets," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 89-105, March.
  4. Charles Noussair & Steven Tucker, 2006. "Futures Markets And Bubble Formation In Experimental Asset Markets ," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(2), pages 167-184, 06.
  5. David Porter & Vernon Smith, 1994. "Stock market bubbles in the laboratory," Applied Mathematical Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 111-128.
  6. Lei, V. & Noussair, C. & Plott, C.R., 1998. "Non-Speculative Bubbles in Experimental Asset Markets: Lack of Common Knowledge of Rationality Vs. Actual Irrationality," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1120, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  7. Charles N. Noussair & Owen Powell, 2010. "Peaks and valleys: Price discovery in experimental asset markets with non-monotonic fundamentals," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 152-180, May.
  8. Reshmaan N. Hussam & David Porter & Vernon L. Smith, 2008. "Thar She Blows: Can Bubbles Be Rekindled with Experienced Subjects?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 924-37, June.
  9. Vivian Lei & Filip Vesely, 2009. "Market Efficiency: Evidence From A No-Bubble Asset Market Experiment," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(2), pages 246-258, 05.
  10. Noussair, C. & Robin, S. & Ruffieux, B., 1998. "Bubbles and Anti-Crashes in Laboratory Asset Markets with Constant Fundamental Values," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1119, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  11. Mark van Boening & Vernon L. Smith & Charissa P. Wellford, 2000. "Dividend timing and behavior in laboratory asset markets," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 567-583.
  12. McCabe, Kevin A., 1989. "Fiat money as a store of value in an experimental market," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 215-231, October.
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