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Redistributive Capital Taxation Revisited

Author

Listed:
  • Özlem Kina
  • Ctirad Slavik
  • Hakki Yazici

Abstract

This paper shows that capital-skill complementarity provides a quantitatively significant rationale to tax capital for redistributive governments. The optimal capital income tax rate is 60%, which is significantly higher than the optimal rate of 48% in an identically calibrated model without capital-skill complementarity. The skill premium falls from 1.9 to 1.67 along the transition following the optimal reform in the capital-skill complementarity model, implying substantial indirect redistribution from skilled to unskilled workers. These results show that a government that cares about redistribution should take into account capital-skill complementarity in production when setting the tax rate on capital income.

Suggested Citation

  • Özlem Kina & Ctirad Slavik & Hakki Yazici, 2020. "Redistributive Capital Taxation Revisited," CESifo Working Paper Series 8627, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_8627
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maliar, Lilia & Maliar, Serguei & Tsener, Inna, 2020. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: Twenty Years After," CEPR Discussion Papers 15228, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Saroj Bhattarai & Jae Won Lee & Woong Yong Park & Choongryul Yang, 2019. "Macroeconomic effects of capital tax rate changes," CESifo Working Paper Series 7630, CESifo.
    3. Chamley, Christophe, 1986. "Optimal Taxation of Capital Income in General Equilibrium with Infinite Lives," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(3), pages 607-622, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital taxation; capital-skill complementarity; inequality; redistribution;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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