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Money Can't Buy EU Love: European Funds and the Brexit Referendum

Author

Listed:
  • Jan Fidrmuc
  • Martin Hulényi
  • Cigdem Börke Tunali

Abstract

We explore the role of the transfers that UK regions received from the European structural and cohesion funds, as well as other economic and social factors, in determining the support for the Remain vote in the Brexit referendum. We .nd that past European transfers have played virtually no role in the referendum. Economically strong regions tend to be in favor of remaining in the EU. Somewhat surprisingly, the intensity of immigration from the EU is positively correlated with the Remain vote.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Fidrmuc & Martin Hulényi & Cigdem Börke Tunali, 2016. "Money Can't Buy EU Love: European Funds and the Brexit Referendum," CESifo Working Paper Series 6107, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6107
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp6107.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Campos, Nauro F & Coricelli, Fabrizio & Moretti, Luigi, 2014. "Economic Growth and Political Integration: Estimating the Benefits from Membership in the European Union Using the Synthetic Counterfactuals Method," CEPR Discussion Papers 9968, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Sandy Dall'erba & Julie Le Gallo, 2008. "Regional convergence and the impact of European structural funds over 1989-1999: A spatial econometric analysis," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(2), pages 219-244, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Torben M. Andersen & Giuseppe Bertola & John Driffill & Clemens Fuest & Harold James & Jan-Egbert Sturm & Branko Uroševic, 2017. "Chapter 2: Economic Policy and the Rise of Populism – It’s Not So Simple," EEAG Report on the European Economy, CESifo Group Munich, vol. 0, pages 50-66, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European integration; economic voting; cohesion policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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