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The Rotten Kid Theorem and Almost Transferable Utility

Author

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  • Elisabeth Gugl
  • Justin Leroux

Abstract

We assume like Bergstrom (1989) and Dijkstra (2007) that each child’s utility is treated as a normal good in the altruistic head’s utility function, and show that if utility functions lead to Almost Transferable Utility children can manipulate the tradeoff between their own utility and the parent’s utility through their own actions, but they have an incentive to maximize the altruistic head’s utility if the altruistic head also considers children’s utilities as Hicksian substitutes and hence the rotten kid theorem holds. A special class of such altruistic utility functions that treat utilities of children as normal and Hicksian substitutes are the Generalized Utilitarian Welfare functions.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisabeth Gugl & Justin Leroux, 2015. "The Rotten Kid Theorem and Almost Transferable Utility," CESifo Working Paper Series 5642, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5642
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp5642.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-1093, Nov.-Dec..
    2. Hindriks, Jean & Peralta, Susana & Weber, Shlomo, 2008. "Competing in taxes and investment under fiscal equalization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(12), pages 2392-2402, December.
    3. Gugl, Elisabeth & Leroux, Justin, 2011. "Share the gain, share the pain? Almost transferable utility, changes in production possibilities, and bargaining solutions," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 62(3), pages 133-143.
    4. Dijkstra, Bouwe R., 2007. "Samaritan versus rotten kid: Another look," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 91-110, September.
    5. Van Kolpin, 2006. "The modeling and analysis of rotten kids," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 26(1), pages 23-30, January.
    6. Richard C. Cornes & Emilson C. D. Silva, 1999. "Rotten Kids, Purity, and Perfection," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(5), pages 1034-1040, October.
    7. Koethenbuerger, Marko, 2008. "Federal tax-transfer policy and intergovernmental pre-commitment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 16-31, January.
    8. Blomquist, N Soren, 1989. "Comparative Statics for Utility Maximization Models with Nonlinear Budget Constraints," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 275-296, May.
    9. Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Ivan Werning, 2002. "Comment on "Rotten Kids, Purity, and Perfection"," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 475-504, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rotten Kid Theorem; transferable utility; Hicksian substitutes; fiscal federalism;

    JEL classification:

    • H70 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - General

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