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Inequality and the State: Comparing U.S. and German Preferences

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  • Giacomo Corneo

Abstract

Survey data from the United States, West Germany and East Germany are analyzed to compare individual attitudes towards political redistribution in each country. In West Germany the "homo oeconomicus effect", the "social rivalry effect" and the "public values effect" simultaneously retain an independent explanatory power of individual attitudes. In the United States the third effect disappears. In East Germany both the second and the third effect disappear.

Suggested Citation

  • Giacomo Corneo, 2000. "Inequality and the State: Comparing U.S. and German Preferences," CESifo Working Paper Series 398, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_398
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo_wp398.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thomas Piketty, 1995. "Social Mobility and Redistributive Politics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 551-584.
    2. Corneo, Giacomo & Gruner, Hans Peter, 2002. "Individual preferences for political redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 83-107, January.
    3. Roberts, Kevin W. S., 1977. "Voting over income tax schedules," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 329-340, December.
    4. Ockenfels, Axel & Weimann, Joachim, 1999. "Types and patterns: an experimental East-West-German comparison of cooperation and solidarity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 275-287, February.
    5. Hans Peter Gruner & Giacomo Corneo, 2000. "Social Limits to Redistribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1491-1507, December.
    6. Lindert, Peter H., 1996. "What Limits Social Spending?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 1-34, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Corneo, Giacomo & Fong, Christina M., 2008. "What's the monetary value of distributive justice," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 289-308.
    2. Alberto Alesina & Nicola Fuchs-Schundeln, 2005. "Good bye Lenin (or not?): The effect of Communism on people's preferences," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2076, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Alesina, Alberto & Di Tella, Rafael & MacCulloch, Robert, 2004. "Inequality and happiness: are Europeans and Americans different?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 2009-2042.
    4. Wei-Kang WONG, 2001. "Some International Evidence on Deviations from Pocketbook Voting and Its Relevance for the Political Economy," Departmental Working Papers wp0103, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
    5. Alesina, Alberto & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2005. "Preferences for redistribution in the land of opportunities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 897-931.
    6. Ilpo Kauppinen & Panu Poutvaara, 2012. "Preferences for Redistribution among Emigrants from a Welfare State," ifo Working Paper Series 120, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    7. Stark, Oded, 2013. "Stressful Integration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1-9.
    8. Frank, Douglas H. & Wertenbroch, Klaus & Maddux, William W., 2015. "Performance pay or redistribution? Cultural differences in just-world beliefs and preferences for wage inequality," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 160-170.

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