IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ces/ceswps/_3852.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Green Hypocrisy?: Environmental Attitudes and Residential Space Heating Expenditure

Author

Listed:
  • Laura Traynor
  • Ian A. Lange
  • Mirko Moro

Abstract

In the UK, the largest proportion of household energy use is for space heating. Popular media make claims of a green hypocrisy: groups which have the strongest attitude towards the environment have the highest emissions. This study examines whether environmental attitudes and behaviours are associated with space heating energy use using data from the British Household Panel Survey. Results find that environmentally friendly attitudes generally do not lead to lower heating expenditures though environmentally friendly behaviours are associated with lower heating expenditure. Also, the effect of these attitudes and behaviours do not change as income increase.

Suggested Citation

  • Laura Traynor & Ian A. Lange & Mirko Moro, 2012. "Green Hypocrisy?: Environmental Attitudes and Residential Space Heating Expenditure," CESifo Working Paper Series 3852, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3852
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp3852.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Meier, Helena & Rehdanz, Katrin, 2010. "Determinants of residential space heating expenditures in Great Britain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 949-959, September.
    2. Leth-Petersen, Soren & Togeby, Mikael, 2001. "Demand for space heating in apartment blocks: measuring effects of policy measures aiming at reducing energy consumption," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 387-403, July.
    3. Dubin, Jeffrey A & McFadden, Daniel L, 1984. "An Econometric Analysis of Residential Electric Appliance Holdings and Consumption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 345-362, March.
    4. Schuler, Andreas & Weber, Christoph & Fahl, Ulrich, 2000. "Energy consumption for space heating of West-German households: empirical evidence, scenario projections and policy implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 877-894, October.
    5. Nesbakken, Runa, 2001. " Energy Consumption for Space Heating: A Discrete-Continuous Approach," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 103(1), pages 165-184, March.
    6. Rehdanz, Katrin, 2007. "Determinants of residential space heating expenditures in Germany," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 167-182, March.
    7. Corrado Di Maria & Susana Ferreira & Emiliya Lazarova, 2010. "Shedding Light On The Light Bulb Puzzle: The Role Of Attitudes And Perceptions In The Adoption Of Energy Efficient Light Bulbs," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 57(1), pages 48-67, February.
    8. Chialin Chen, 2001. "Design for the Environment: A Quality-Based Model for Green Product Development," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(2), pages 250-263, February.
    9. Baker, Paul & Blundell, Richard & Micklewright, John, 1989. "Modelling Household Energy Expenditures Using Micro-data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 720-738, September.
    10. Comerford, David A., 2011. "Attenuating focalism in affective forecasts of the commuting experience: Implications for economic decisions and policy making," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 691-699.
    11. van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M., 2008. "Environmental regulation of households: An empirical review of economic and psychological factors," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(4), pages 559-574, July.
    12. Kotchen, Matthew J. & Moore, Michael R., 2007. "Private provision of environmental public goods: Household participation in green-electricity programs," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-16, January.
    13. Abrahamse, Wokje & Steg, Linda, 2009. "How do socio-demographic and psychological factors relate to households' direct and indirect energy use and savings?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 711-720, October.
    14. Diamantopoulos, Adamantios & Schlegelmilch, Bodo B. & Sinkovics, Rudolf R. & Bohlen, Greg M., 2003. "Can socio-demographics still play a role in profiling green consumers? A review of the evidence and an empirical investigation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 465-480, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:joepsy:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:313-328 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cristina Cattaneo, 2018. "Internal and External Barriers to Energy Efficiency: Made-to-Measure Policy Interventions," Working Papers 2018.08, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Ramos, A. & Gago, A. & Labandeira, X. & Linares, P., 2015. "The role of information for energy efficiency in the residential sector," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(S1), pages 17-29.
    4. Ana Ramos & Xavier Labandeira & Andreas Lšschel, 2015. "Pro-Environmental Households and Energy Efficiency in Spain," Working Papers 01-2015, Economics for Energy.
    5. Ana Ramos & Xavier Labandeira & Andreas Löschel, 2016. "Pro-environmental Households and Energy Efficiency in Spain," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(2), pages 367-393, February.
    6. Hendrik Schmitz & Reinhard Madlener, 2016. "Heterogeneity in Price Responsiveness for Residential Space Heating in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 877, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Xavier Labandeira & Ana Ramos, 2012. "Household Environmental Attitudes and Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Evidence from Spanish Data," Working Papers fa08-2012, Economics for Energy.
    8. Volland, Benjamin, 2017. "The role of risk and trust attitudes in explaining residential energy demand: Evidence from the United Kingdom," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 14-30.
    9. Natalia Melgar & Irene Mussio & Maximo Rossi, 2013. "Environmental Concern and Behavior: Do Personal Attributes Matter?," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0113, Department of Economics - dECON.
    10. Jeżewska-Zychowicz, Marzena & Jeznach, Maria, 0. "Consumers’ Behaviours Related To Packaging And Their Attitudes Towards Environment," Journal of Agribusiness and Rural Development, University of Life Sciences, Poznan, Poland, issue 3.
    11. Chankrajang, Thanyaporn & Muttarak, Raya, 2017. "Green Returns to Education: Does Schooling Contribute to Pro-Environmental Behaviours? Evidence from Thailand," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 434-448.
    12. repec:aen:journl:ej38-3-welsch is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Ivan Tilov & Benjamin Volland & Mehdi Farsi, 2017. "Interactions in Swiss Households' Energy Demand: A Holistic Approach," IRENE Working Papers 17-11, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    green hypocrisy; heating expenditures; environmental attitudes; BHPS;

    JEL classification:

    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3852. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Klaus Wohlrabe). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.