IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ces/ceswps/_2458.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Bringing the Copenhagen Global Climate Change Negotiations to Conclusion

Author

Listed:
  • John Whalley
  • Sean Walsh

Abstract

In this paper we discuss the global negotiations now underway and aimed at achieving new climate change mitigation and other arrangements after 2012 (the end of the Kyoto commitment period). These were initiated in Bali in December 2007 and are scheduled to conclude by the end of 2009 in Copenhagen. As such, this negotiation is effectively the second round in ongoing global negotiations on climate change and further rounds will almost certainly follow. We highlight both the vast scope and vagueness of the negotiating mandate, the many outstanding major issues to be accommodated between negotiating parties, the lack of a mechanism to force collective decision making in the negotiation, and their short time frame. The likely lack of compliance with prior Kyoto commitments by several OECD countries (some to a major degree), the effective absence in Kyoto of compliance/enforcement mechanisms, and growing linkage to non-climate change areas (principally trade) all further complicate the task of bringing the negotiation to conclusion. The major clearage we see that needs to be bridged in the negotiations is between OECD countries on the one hand, and lower wage, large population, rapidly growing countries (China, India, Russia, Brazil) on the other.

Suggested Citation

  • John Whalley & Sean Walsh, 2008. "Bringing the Copenhagen Global Climate Change Negotiations to Conclusion," CESifo Working Paper Series 2458, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2458
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp2458.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Whalley, John & Zissimos, Ben, 2000. "Trade and environment linkage and a possible World Environmental Organisation," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(4), pages 483-529, October.
    2. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2007. "Public Policies against Global Warming," NBER Working Papers 13454, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Magnus Lodefalk & John Whalley, 2002. "Reviewing Proposals for a World Environmental Organisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 601-617, May.
    4. Ben Lockwood & John Whalley, 2010. "Carbon‐motivated Border Tax Adjustments: Old Wine in Green Bottles?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(6), pages 810-819, June.
    5. John Whalley, 2001. "What Could a World Environmental Organization Do?," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 1(1), pages 29-34, February.
    6. Cooper, Richard N., 2000. "Trade and the environment," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(4), pages 483-529, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Laurency & Dirk Schindler, 2011. "International Climate Agreements, Cost Reductions and Convergence of Partisan Politics," CESifo Working Paper Series 3591, CESifo.
    2. Mechtel, Mario & Potrafke, Niklas, 2009. "Political Cycles in Active Labor Market Policies," MPRA Paper 14270, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Hans Gersbach & Noemi Hummel, 2009. "Climate Policy and Development," CESifo Working Paper Series 2807, CESifo.
    4. John Whalley & Dana Medianu, 2010. "The Deepening China Brazil Economic Relationship," CESifo Working Paper Series 3289, CESifo.
    5. Harry Clarke, 2010. "Carbon Leakages, Consumption‐based Carbon Taxes and International Climate Change Agreements," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 29(2), pages 156-168, June.
    6. Burkard Eberlein & Dirk Matten, 2009. "Business Responses to Climate Change Regulation in Canada and Germany: Lessons for MNCs from Emerging Economies," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 86(2), pages 241-255, March.
    7. Sean Walsh & Huifang Tian & John Whalley & Manmohan Agarwal, 2011. "China and India’s participation in global climate negotiations," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 261-273, September.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Christoph Böhringer & Jared C. Carbone & Thomas F. Rutherford, 2018. "Embodied Carbon Tariffs," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 120(1), pages 183-210, January.
    2. Anthony J. Venables, 2014. "Depletion and Development: Natural Resource Supply with Endogenous Field Opening," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(3), pages 313-336.
    3. Nicole A. MATHYS & Jaime DE MELO, 2010. "Trade and Climate Change: The Challenges Ahead," Working Papers P14, FERDI.
    4. Böhringer, Christoph & Fischer, Carolyn & Rosendahl, Knut Einar, 2014. "Cost-effective unilateral climate policy design: Size matters," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 318-339.
    5. John Whalley, 2011. "What Role for Trade in a Post‐2012 Global Climate Policy Regime," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(11), pages 1844-1862, November.
    6. Snorre Kverndokk & Knut Einar Rosendahl, 2013. "Effects of Transport Regulation on the Oil Market: Does Market Power Matter?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(3), pages 662-694, July.
    7. Paola Rocchi & Iñaki Arto & Jordi Roca & Mònica Serrano, 2015. "Carbon-motivated border tax adjustment: a proposal for the EU," UB Economics Working Papers 2015/327, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB School of Economics.
    8. Edwin van der Werf, 2010. "Unilateral climate policy, asymmetric backstop adoption and carbon leakage in a two-region Hotelling model," Working Papers V-320-10, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2010.
    9. Daubanes, Julien, 2009. "Taxation of Oil Products and GDP Dynamics of Oil-Rich Countries," TSE Working Papers 09-012, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    10. Liam F. Beiser-McGrath & Thomas Bernauer & Jaehyun Song & Azusa Uji, 2021. "Understanding public support for domestic contributions to global collective goods," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 166(3), pages 1-20, June.
    11. Strand, Jon, 2013. "Strategic climate policy with offsets and incomplete abatement: Carbon taxes versus cap-and-trade," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 202-218.
    12. Strand, Jon, 2010. "Optimal fossil-fuel taxation with backstop technologies and tenure risk," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 418-422, March.
    13. Quentin Grafton, R. & Kompas, Tom & Van Long, Ngo, 2012. "Substitution between biofuels and fossil fuels: Is there a green paradox?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 328-341.
    14. d'Autume, Antoine & Hartwick, John M. & Schubert, Katheline, 2010. "The zero discounting and maximin optimal paths in a simple model of global warming," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 193-207, March.
    15. Bård Harstad, 2012. "Buy Coal! A Case for Supply-Side Environmental Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 120(1), pages 77-115.
    16. Frank Biermann & Olwen Davies & Nicolien Grijp, 2009. "Environmental policy integration and the architecture of global environmental governance," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 351-369, November.
    17. Michael Grubb, 2011. "International climate finance from border carbon cost levelling," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 1050-1057, May.
    18. Julien Daubanes & Pierre Lasserre, 2014. "Dispatching after Producing: The Supply of Non-Renewable Resources," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-42, CIRANO.
    19. Christoph Böhringer & Thomas F. Rutherford, 2017. "Paris after Trump: An Inconvenient Insight," CESifo Working Paper Series 6531, CESifo.
    20. Marjanneke Vijge, 2013. "The promise of new institutionalism: explaining the absence of a World or United Nations Environment Organisation," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 153-176, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; global negotiation;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2458. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Klaus Wohlrabe (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.