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Paying for Banking Services: What Determines the Fees?

  • Pavel Dvorak
  • Jan Hanousek

We analyze a unique dataset to test an empirical model of retail bank fee determinants in five Central European countries. Due to the data structure we can cope with heterogeneity and cross-subsidization by employing a representative fee index instead of using variables associated with individual fees. We find support for the Structure-Conduct-Performance hypothesis about the effect of industry concentration, the importance of differences in reliance on cashless payments, and differences in the labor intensity and technology level of bank operations. We also show that cross-country differences in retail bank fees can be explained by fundamental economic factors.

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File URL: http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp388.pdf
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Paper provided by The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague in its series CERGE-EI Working Papers with number wp388.

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Date of creation: Aug 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp388
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  1. Lepetit, Laetitia & Nys, Emmanuelle & Rous, Philippe & Tarazi, Amine, 2008. "The expansion of services in European banking: Implications for loan pricing and interest margins," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 2325-2335, November.
  2. Berger, Allen N & Hannan, Timothy H, 1989. "The Price-Concentration Relationship in Banking," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(2), pages 291-99, May.
  3. Rhoades, Stephen A. & Rutz, Roger D., 1982. "Market power and firm risk : A test of the `quiet life' hypothesis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 73-85.
  4. Evžen Koèenda & Jan Hanousek & Peter Ondko, 2007. "The Banking Sector in New EU Member Countries: A Sectoral Financial Flows Analysis (in English)," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 57(5-6), pages 200-224, August.
  5. Hannan, Timothy H., 2006. "Retail deposit fees and multimarket banking," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 2561-2578, September.
  6. Sam Peltzman, 1977. "The Gains and Losses From Industrial Concentration," NBER Working Papers 0163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Allen, Linda, 1988. "The Determinants of Bank Interest Margins: A Note," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(02), pages 231-235, June.
  8. Calem, Paul S & Carlino, Gerald A, 1991. "The Concentration/Conduct Relationship in Bank Deposit Markets," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 268-76, May.
  9. Baumol, William J, 1982. "Contestable Markets: An Uprising in the Theory of Industry Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 1-15, March.
  10. Hannan, Timothy H & Berger, Allen N, 1991. "The Rigidity of Prices: Evidence from the Banking Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 938-45, September.
  11. Shaffer, Sherrill, 2004. "Patterns of competition in banking," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 287-313.
  12. Brewer III, Elijah & Jackson III, William E., 2006. "A note on the "risk-adjusted" price-concentration relationship in banking," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1041-1054, March.
  13. Demsetz, Harold, 1973. "Industry Structure, Market Rivalry, and Public Policy," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 1-9, April.
  14. Ho, Thomas S. Y. & Saunders, Anthony, 1981. "The Determinants of Bank Interest Margins: Theory and Empirical Evidence," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(04), pages 581-600, November.
  15. Berger, Allen N & Hannan, Timothy H, 1992. "The Price-Concentration Relationship in Banking: A Reply," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 376-79, May.
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