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Talking Less and Moving the Market More: Is this the Recipe for Monetary Policy Effectiveness? Evidence from the ECB and the Fed

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  • Carlo Rosa

Abstract

This paper examines and compares the communication strategies of the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank, and their effectiveness. First we do a comparative study exercise. We find that on monetary policy committee meeting days both the ECB and the Fed can move market rates using either monetary policy or news shocks. However, the response of the long-end of the American term structure to the surprise component of Fed's statements is significantly larger than the reaction of European long-term yields to ECB's announcements. This result is intimately related to the higher transparency of U.S. Fed statements compared to ECB announcements rather than to the different institutional mandate of the two central banks. Second, we investigate the cross-effects i.e. the Fed's ability to move European interest rates and the corresponding ECB's capacity to move American rates. We find that the Fed has been more able to move the European interst rates of all maturities than the ECB to move American rates. This finding is tied to the predominance of dollar fixed income assets rather than to an attempt of the ECB to mimic the Fed.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Rosa, 2008. "Talking Less and Moving the Market More: Is this the Recipe for Monetary Policy Effectiveness? Evidence from the ECB and the Fed," CEP Discussion Papers dp0855, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0855
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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp0855.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alan S. Blinder & Michael Ehrmann & Marcel Fratzscher & Jakob De Haan & David-Jan Jansen, 2008. "Central Bank Communication and Monetary Policy: A Survey of Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(4), pages 910-945, December.
    2. repec:fce:doctra:13-03 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. C.Jardet & A. Monks, 2014. "Euro Area monetary policy shocks: impact on financial asset prices during the crisis?," Working papers 512, Banque de France.
    4. Tsai, Chun-Li, 2014. "The effects of monetary policy on stock returns: Financing constraints and “informative” and “uninformative” FOMC statements," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 273-290.
    5. Paul Hubert, 2015. "The Influence and Policy Signalling Role of FOMC Forecasts," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 77(5), pages 655-680, October.
    6. Mira Farka & Adrian R. Fleissig, 2012. "The effect of FOMC statements on asset prices," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 387-416, April.
    7. Wang, Shen & Mayes, David G., 2012. "Monetary policy announcements and stock reactions: An international comparison," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 145-164.
    8. repec:pri:cepsud:161blinder is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Central Bank; U.S. Federal Reserve; central bank communication; monetary policy and news shocks; term structure of interest rates;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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