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The Provision of Training in Britain: Case Studies of Inter-Firm Coordination

  • Jim Foreman
  • Howard Gospel
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    This article examines how and why employers cooperate in the provision of training. Such cooperation has a long history in Britain, but it has varied over time in extent and strength. It exists in a strong form in the German speaking countries where employers' organisations and chambers of commerce are a fundamental part of the training system. In the UK, we argue that this form of training is more prevalent than is often thought and that it can have a positive effect on the quantity and quality of training. Case studies are presented of the following: an industry-wide body, namely an employers' association; a local multi- industry body, namely a chamber of commerce; a traditional group training association; a local consortium of big employers; and a network of firms in a large company's supply chain. Though such forms of organisation have much to commend them in the training field, in the UK coverage is uneven and its stability is fragile.

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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp0555.pdf
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    Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0555.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0555
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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    1. MarĂ­a Guadalupe, 2002. "The Hidden Costs of Fixed Term Contracts: the Impact On Work Accidents," CEP Discussion Papers dp0551, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Gilles Duranton, 2002. "City Size Distributions As A Consequence of the Growth Process," CEP Discussion Papers dp0550, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Nickell, Stephen & Redding, Stephen J. & Swaffield, Joanna K, 2001. "Educational Attainment, Labour Market Institutions and the Structure of Production," CEPR Discussion Papers 3068, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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