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Productivity Growth Patterns in U.S. Food Manufacturing: Case of Meat Products Industry


  • Pinar Celikkol
  • Spiro Stefanou


A panel constructed from the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Research Database is used to measure total factor productivity growth at the plant-level and analyzes the multifactor bias of technical change for the U.S. meat products industry from 1972 through 1995. For example, addressing TFP growth decomposition for the meat products sub-sector by quartile ranks shows that the technical change effect is the dominant element of TFP growth for the first two quartiles, while the scale effect dominates TFP growth for the higher two quartiles. Throughout the time period, technical change is 1) capital-using; 2) material-saving; 3) labor-using; and, 4) energy-saving and becoming energy-using after 1980. The smaller sized plants are more likely to fluctuate in their productivity rankings; in contrast, large plants are more stable in their productivity rankings. Plant productivity analysis indicate that less than 50% of the plants in the meat industry stay in the same category, indicating considerable movement between productivity rank categories. Investment analysis results strongly indicate that plant-level investments are quite lumpy since a relatively small percent of observations account for a disproportionate share of overall investment. Productivity growth is found to be positively correlated with recent investment spikes for plants with TFP ranking in the middle two quartiles and uncorrelated with firms in the smallest and largest quartiles. Similarly, past TFP growth rates are positively correlated with future investment spikes for firms in the same quartiles. \

Suggested Citation

  • Pinar Celikkol & Spiro Stefanou, 2004. "Productivity Growth Patterns in U.S. Food Manufacturing: Case of Meat Products Industry," Working Papers 04-04, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:04-04

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefanou, Spiro E., 2009. "A Dynamic Characterization of Efficiency," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(1), January.
    2. Pinar Celikkol & Spiro Stefanou, 2004. "Productivity Growth Patterns in U.S. Food Manufacturing: Case of Dairy Products Industry," Working Papers 04-08, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    More about this item


    Total Factor Productivity Growth; Input Bias of Technical Change; Lumpy Investment; U.S. Meat Products Manufacturing;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing
    • L66 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Food; Beverages; Cosmetics; Tobacco


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