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Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting 3: Identifying the Choice Set and Estimating Binary Choice Models for Technology-Based Alternatives

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  • Mokhtarian, Patricia L.
  • Salomon, Ilan

Abstract

Previous papers in this series have presented a conceptual model of the individual decision to telecommute and explored relationships among constraints, preference, and choice. A related paper has developed a binary model of the preference for home-based telecom- muting. Noting that there is a wide gap between preferring to telecommute (88% of the sample) and actually telecommuting (13%), this paper develops binary logit models of role- commuting adoption. Two approaches to dealing with constraints are compared: incorporating them directly into the utility function, and using them to define the choice set. Models using the first approach appear to be statistically superior in this analysis, explaining 63-64% of the information in the data. Variables significant to choice include those relating to work and travel drives, and awareness, manager support, job suitability, technology, and discipline constraints. The best model was used to analyze the impact of relaxing three key constraints on the 355 people in the sample for whom telecommuting was previously identified to be a Preferred Impossible Alternative. When unawareness, lack of manager support, and job unsuitability constraints are relaxed, 28% of the people in the PIA category would be expected to adopt telecommuting. The importance of behavioral models to accurately forecasting telecommuting adoption is emphasized and is suggested to have wider implications for predicting technology-based activity changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan, 1995. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting 3: Identifying the Choice Set and Estimating Binary Choice Models for Technology-Based Alternatives," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt80w5p49p, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt80w5p49p
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan, 1997. "Modeling the desire to telecommute: The importance of attitudinal factors in behavioral models," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 35-50, January.
    2. Mannering, Jill S. & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 1995. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting Frequency in California: An Exploratory Analysis," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt08s817dr, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Genç, Murat, 1994. "Aggregation and heterogeneity of choice sets in discrete choice models," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 11-22, February.
    4. P L Mokhtarian & I Salomon, 1996. "Modeling the choice of telecommuting: 2. A case of the preferred impossible alternative," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 28(10), pages 1859-1876, October.
    5. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan, 1995. "Modeling the Preference for Telecommuting: Measuring Attitudes and Other Variables," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2kn111m8, University of California Transportation Center.
    6. P L Mokhtarian & I Salomon, 1994. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting: Setting the Context," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 26(5), pages 749-766, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pawlak, Jacek & Polak, John W. & Sivakumar, Aruna, 2015. "Towards a microeconomic framework for modelling the joint choice of activity–travel behaviour and ICT use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 92-112.
    2. Hynes, Mike, 2016. "Developing (tele)work? A multi-level sociotechnical perspective of telework in Ireland," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 21-31.
    3. Mokhtarian, Patricia L & Ory, David T, 2005. "Don't Work, Work at Home, or Commute? Discrete Choice Models of the Decision for San Francisco Bay Area Residents," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt5cs0q85s, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    4. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan, 1997. "Modeling the desire to telecommute: The importance of attitudinal factors in behavioral models," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 35-50, January.
    5. Varma, Krishna & Ho, Chaang-Iuan & Stanek, David & Mokhtarian, Patricia, 1998. "Duration and Frequency of Telecenter Use: Once a Telecommuter, Always a Telecommuter?," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt61t9j2vb, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    6. Ory, David T. & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "Modeling the Joint Labor-Commute Engagement Decisions of San Francisco Bay Area Residents," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7600m6qv, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Song, Moohoun & Orazem, Peter & Singh, Rajesh, 2006. "Broadband Access, Telecommuting and the Urban-Rural Digital Divide," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12495, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Tang, Wei & Mokhtarian, Patricia L & Handy, Susan L, 2008. "The Role of Neighborhood Characteristics in the Adoption and Frequency of Working at Home: Empirical Evidence from Northern California," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt13x2q3rb, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    9. Wilton, Robert D. & Páez, Antonio & Scott, Darren M., 2011. "Why do you care what other people think? A qualitative investigation of social influence and telecommuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 269-282, May.
    10. Ory, D T & Mokhtarian, Patricia L, 2005. "Don’t Work, Work at Home, or Commute? Discrete Choice Models of the Decision for San Francisco Bay Area Residents," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt71q8b94r, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    11. Nijland, Linda & Dijst, Martin, 2015. "Commuting-related fringe benefits in the Netherlands: Interrelationships and company, employee and location characteristics," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 358-371.
    12. Mokhtarian, Patricia L & Henderson, Dennis, 2000. "Analyzing the Travel Behavior of Home-Based Workers in the 1991 CALTRANS Statewide Travel Survey," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6qp7q90q, University of California Transportation Center.

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