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Why do you care what other people think? A qualitative investigation of social influence and telecommuting

  • Wilton, Robert D.
  • Páez, Antonio
  • Scott, Darren M.
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    The effect of social interactions on decision-making is a topic of current interest in the travel behavior literature. These interactions have been investigated primarily from an intra-household perspective, but increasingly too in other types of social settings. In the case of interactions within a workplace, it has been suggested that the decision to telecommute may have some important social components. Previous research has concentrated on social isolation, and the effect on job satisfaction of qualitatively different (i.e., telecommunications-mediated) relationships with managers and colleagues. A topic that remains unexplored is the way social norms, in effect the influence of other people's behavior, may influence the decision to adopt telecommuting. In this paper we set to investigate, within a qualitative framework, the role of social contact in the process of acquiring information on, and making decisions about, telecommuting. The results indicate that social contact does play a subtle but non-trivial role in the adoption and continuation process, and offer some insights about the importance of the social dimension, institutional set-up, and how they interact to influence the decision to telecommute.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VG7-523TCTW-1/2/e34f9224cf6b59729ee69edd702db253
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

    Volume (Year): 45 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 4 (May)
    Pages: 269-282

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:45:y:2011:i:4:p:269-282
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    1. Scott, Darren M. & Kanaroglou, Pavlos S., 2002. "An activity-episode generation model that captures interactions between household heads: development and empirical analysis," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 875-896, December.
    2. Harvey J Miller, 2005. "Necessary space - time conditions for human interaction," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 32(3), pages 381-401, May.
    3. Fukuda, Daisuke & Morichi, Shigeru, 2007. "Incorporating aggregate behavior in an individual's discrete choice: An application to analyzing illegal bicycle parking behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-325, May.
    4. Patricia Mokhtarian & Ilan Salomon, 2005. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting 3: Identifying the Choice Set and Estimating Binary Choice Models for Technology-Based Alternatives," Labor and Demography 0505010, EconWPA.
    5. Antonio P�ez & Darren M Scott, 2007. "Social influence on travel behavior: a simulation example of the decision to telecommute," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 39(3), pages 647-665, March.
    6. Zhang, Junyi & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2006. "Representing household time allocation behavior by endogenously incorporating diverse intra-household interactions: A case study in the context of elderly couples," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 54-74, January.
    7. P L Mokhtarian & I Salomon, 1994. "Modeling the choice of telecommuting: setting the context," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 26(5), pages 749-766, May.
    8. Kevin Daniels, 2001. "Teleworking: Frameworks for Organizational Research," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(8), pages 1151-1185, December.
    9. Elenna Dugundji & Antonio P�ez & Theo Arentze, 2008. "Social networks, choices, mobility, and travel," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(6), pages 956-960, November.
    10. Juan Carrasco & Eric Miller, 2006. "Exploring the propensity to perform social activities: a social network approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(5), pages 463-480, 09.
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