IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v45y2011i4p269-282.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Why do you care what other people think? A qualitative investigation of social influence and telecommuting

Author

Listed:
  • Wilton, Robert D.
  • Páez, Antonio
  • Scott, Darren M.

Abstract

The effect of social interactions on decision-making is a topic of current interest in the travel behavior literature. These interactions have been investigated primarily from an intra-household perspective, but increasingly too in other types of social settings. In the case of interactions within a workplace, it has been suggested that the decision to telecommute may have some important social components. Previous research has concentrated on social isolation, and the effect on job satisfaction of qualitatively different (i.e., telecommunications-mediated) relationships with managers and colleagues. A topic that remains unexplored is the way social norms, in effect the influence of other people's behavior, may influence the decision to adopt telecommuting. In this paper we set to investigate, within a qualitative framework, the role of social contact in the process of acquiring information on, and making decisions about, telecommuting. The results indicate that social contact does play a subtle but non-trivial role in the adoption and continuation process, and offer some insights about the importance of the social dimension, institutional set-up, and how they interact to influence the decision to telecommute.

Suggested Citation

  • Wilton, Robert D. & Páez, Antonio & Scott, Darren M., 2011. "Why do you care what other people think? A qualitative investigation of social influence and telecommuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 269-282, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:45:y:2011:i:4:p:269-282
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965-8564(11)00010-3
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kevin Daniels & David Lamond & Peter Standen, 2001. "Teleworking: Frameworks for Organizational Research," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(8), pages 1151-1185, December.
    2. P L Mokhtarian & I Salomon, 1996. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting: 3. Identifying the Choice Set and Estimating Binary Choice Models for Technology-Based Alternatives," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 28(10), pages 1877-1894, October.
    3. Juan Carrasco & Eric Miller, 2006. "Exploring the propensity to perform social activities: a social network approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(5), pages 463-480, September.
    4. Scott, Darren M. & Kanaroglou, Pavlos S., 2002. "An activity-episode generation model that captures interactions between household heads: development and empirical analysis," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 875-896, December.
    5. Zhang, Junyi & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2006. "Representing household time allocation behavior by endogenously incorporating diverse intra-household interactions: A case study in the context of elderly couples," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 54-74, January.
    6. Fukuda, Daisuke & Morichi, Shigeru, 2007. "Incorporating aggregate behavior in an individual's discrete choice: An application to analyzing illegal bicycle parking behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-325, May.
    7. Antonio Páez & Darren M Scott, 2007. "Social Influence on Travel Behavior: A Simulation Example of the Decision to Telecommute," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 39(3), pages 647-665, March.
    8. repec:sae:envirb:v:35:y:2008:i:6:p:956-960 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Harvey J Miller, 2005. "Necessary Space—Time Conditions for Human Interaction," Environment and Planning B, , vol. 32(3), pages 381-401, June.
    10. P L Mokhtarian & I Salomon, 1994. "Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting: Setting the Context," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 26(5), pages 749-766, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Becky P. Y. Loo & Bo Wang, 2018. "Factors associated with home-based e-working and e-shopping in Nanjing, China," Transportation, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 365-384, March.
    2. Lo, Siu Hing & van Breukelen, Gerard J.P. & Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y. & Kok, Gerjo, 2013. "Proenvironmental travel behavior among office workers: A qualitative study of individual and organizational determinants," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 11-22.
    3. Maness, Michael & Cirillo, Cinzia, 2016. "An indirect latent informational conformity social influence choice model: Formulation and case study," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 93(PA), pages 75-101.
    4. Miller, Harvey J., 2013. "Beyond sharing: cultivating cooperative transportation systems through geographic information science," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 296-308.
    5. Aguilera, Anne & Lethiais, Virginie & Rallet, Alain & Proulhac, Laurent, 2016. "Home-based telework in France: Characteristics, barriers and perspectives," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 1-11.
    6. Shao, Jing & Yang, Hangjun & Xing, Xiaoqiang & Yang, Liu, 2016. "E-commerce and traffic congestion: An economic and policy analysis," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 91-103.
    7. Cools, Mario & Creemers, Lieve, 2013. "The dual role of weather forecasts on changes in activity-travel behavior," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 167-175.
    8. Pike, Susan & Lubell, Mark, 2016. "Geography and social networks in transportation mode choice," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 184-193.
    9. Kurniawan, Jude Herijadi & Ong, Corinne & Cheah, Lynette, 2018. "Examining values and influences affecting public expectations of future urban mobility: A Singapore case study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 66-75.
    10. Eva Thulin & Bertil Vilhelmson & Martina Johansson, 2019. "New Telework, Time Pressure, and Time Use Control in Everyday Life," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(11), pages 1-17, May.
    11. Pike, Susan & Lubell, Mark, 2018. "The conditional effects of social influence in transportation mode choice," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 2-10.
    12. Cherchi, Elisabetta, 2017. "A stated choice experiment to measure the effect of informational and normative conformity in the preference for electric vehicles," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 88-104.
    13. Jesus M. Barajas, 2020. "Supplemental infrastructure: how community networks and immigrant identity influence cycling," Transportation, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 1251-1274, June.
    14. Maness, Michael & Cirillo, Cinzia & Dugundji, Elenna R., 2015. "Generalized behavioral framework for choice models of social influence: Behavioral and data concerns in travel behavior," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 137-150.
    15. Sharmeen, Fariya & Arentze, Theo & Timmermans, Harry, 2014. "An analysis of the dynamics of activity and travel needs in response to social network evolution and life-cycle events: A structural equation model," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 159-171.
    16. Sherwin, Henrietta & Chatterjee, Kiron & Jain, Juliet, 2014. "An exploration of the importance of social influence in the decision to start bicycling in England," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 32-45.
    17. Pan, Xiaofeng & Rasouli, Soora & Timmermans, Harry, 2019. "Modeling social influence using sequential stated adaptation experiments: A study of city trip itinerary choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 652-672.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:45:y:2011:i:4:p:269-282. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.