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Leaders, Followers and Laggards: Adoption of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement in California

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  • Wang, Rui

Abstract

Little quantitative research has been devoted to voluntary climate actions at the local level in comparison to those at federal and state levels. It is unclear why some cities act as leaders in the fight against climate change, some act as followers, while others remain laggards. This study empirically tests some hypotheses about local political will to mitigate climate change. Applying a survival analysis to California cities’ adoption of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement, this study examines the association between cities’ adoption of the Mayors Agreement and a broad range of characteristics, such as: local demographics, jurisdiction size, government structure, political preference and environmentalism, local air quality and congestion level, and behavior of neighboring jurisdictions. Results support the importance of income level, political preference and environmentalism of the local communities, as well as a city’s administrative capacity and autonomy. Congestion relief seems to be an important cobenefit motivating cities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Rui, 2010. "Leaders, Followers and Laggards: Adoption of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement in California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7z31n285, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt7z31n285
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lutsey, Nicholas & Sperling, Daniel, 2008. "America's bottom-up climate change mitigation policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 673-685, February.
    2. Rege, Mari & Telle, Kjetil, 2004. "The impact of social approval and framing on cooperation in public good situations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1625-1644, July.
    3. Kahn, Matthew E., 2007. "Do greens drive Hummers or hybrids? Environmental ideology as a determinant of consumer choice," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 129-145, September.
    4. Kotchen, Matthew J. & Moore, Michael R., 2007. "Private provision of environmental public goods: Household participation in green-electricity programs," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-16, January.
    5. Lutsey, Nicholas P. & Sperling, Dan, 2008. "America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt8jj755d4, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
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    Keywords

    Social and Behavioral Sciences;

    Statistics

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