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Do city climate plans reduce emissions?

  • Millard-Ball, Adam
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    More than 600 local governments in the US are developing climate action plans that lay out specific measures to reduce emissions from municipal operations, households and firms. To date, however, it is unclear whether these plans are being implemented or have any causal effects on emissions. Using data from California, I provide the first quantitative analysis of the impacts of climate plans. I find that cities with climate plans have had far greater success in implementing strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions than their counterparts without such plans. For example, they have more green buildings, spend more on pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, and have implemented more programs to divert waste from methane-generating landfills. I find little evidence, however, that climate plans play any causal role in this success. Rather, citizens’ environmental preferences appear to be a more important driver of both the adoption of climate plans and the pursuit of specific emission reduction measures. Thus, climate plans are largely codifying outcomes that would have been achieved in any case.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

    Volume (Year): 71 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 289-311

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:71:y:2012:i:3:p:289-311
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