IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Adjustment Costs from Environmental Change Induced by Incomplete Information and Learning

  • Kolstad, Charles D.
  • Kelly, David L.
  • Mitchell, Glenn

The paper begins with the problem of a firm subject to random productivity shocks drawn from a particular distribution. We are concerned with the case whereby the distribution of the shocks changes without the knowledge of the firm. Over time the firm learns about the nature and extent of the change in the distribution of the shock and adjusts, incurring adjustment costs in the process. The long run loss in profits (Ž) due to the shift in the distribution we term the adaptation costs. The transitory profit loss, incurred while the firm is learning about the distribution shift, is termed the adjustment cost. The theory is developed and then applied to the problem of measuring adaptation and adjustment costs in the face of unanticipated and imperfectly observed climate change in agriculture. The empirical part of the paper involves estimating a supply function for corn that depends on actual weather realizations and expected weather, using county level data for the US. We then simulate the effect of an unobserved climate shock, where learning about the climate shock is by observing the weather and updating prior knowledge using Bayes Rule.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9mx119gc.pdf;origin=repeccitec
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara in its series University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series with number qt9mx119gc.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 06 Jun 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsbec:qt9mx119gc
Contact details of provider: Postal:
2127 North Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9210

Phone: (805) 893-3670
Fax: (805) 893-8830
Web page: http://www.escholarship.org/repec/ucsbecon_dwp/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. A.J. Fischer & A.J. Arnold & M. Gibbs, 1996. "Information and the Speed of Innovation Adoption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1073-1081.
  2. Demers, Fanny & Demers, Michel, 1990. "Price uncertainty, the competitive firm and the dual theory of choice under risk," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1181-1199, September.
  3. Ellison, Glenn & Fudenberg, Drew, 1992. "Rules of Thumb for Social Learning," IDEI Working Papers 17, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  4. Hansen, LeRoy T., 1991. "Farmer Response to Changes in Climate: The Case of Corn Production," Journal of Agricultural Economics Research, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, issue 4.
  5. Robert Mendelsohn & William D. Nordhaus & Shaw, Daigee, 1992. "The Impact of Climate on Agriculture: A Ricardian Approach," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1010, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  6. Sandmo, Agnar, 1971. "On the Theory of the Competitive Firm under Price Uncertainty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(1), pages 65-73, March.
  7. Westcott, Paul C., 1989. "An Analysis of Factors Influencing Corn Yields," Outlook Reports 151701, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Wolak, Frank A & Kolstad, Charles D, 1991. "A Model of Homogeneous Input Demand under Price Uncertainty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 514-38, June.
  9. John Reilly, 1995. "Climate Change and Global Agriculture: Recent Findings and Issues," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(3), pages 727-733.
  10. Batra, Raveendra N & Ullah, Aman, 1974. "Competitive Firm and the Theory of Input Demand under Price Uncertainty," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(3), pages 537-48, May/June.
  11. Rulon D. Pope & Jean-Paul Chavas, 1994. "Cost Functions Under Production Uncertainty," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 76(2), pages 196-204.
  12. Blair, Roger D, 1974. "Random Input Prices and the Theory of the Firm," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(2), pages 214-26, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsbec:qt9mx119gc. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lisa Schiff)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.