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The Impact of Climate on Agriculture: A Ricardian Approach

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Abstract

Because of the potential for global warming, there are widespread concerns about the impact of changing climate upon the productivity of land in farming and other sectors. This paper develops a new approach for measuring the economic impact of environmental factors such as climate on production by examining the direct impact of the environmental factor on land productivity as measured by land prices. This new method is applied to examine the effect of climate on agriculture using cross-sectional farm data for almost 3000 counties in the United States. It finds substantial impacts of climatic variation on both land values and farm revenues. Among the central findings are that higher temperatures in all seasons except autumn reduce all seasons except autumn increases farm values. The relationships are, however, nonlinear and complex.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Mendelsohn & William D. Nordhaus & Shaw, Daigee, 1992. "The Impact of Climate on Agriculture: A Ricardian Approach," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1010, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:1010
    Note: CFP 876.
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    File URL: http://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d10/d1010.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Munang Tingem & Mike Rivington, 2009. "Adaptation for crop agriculture to climate change in Cameroon: Turning on the heat," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 153-168, February.
    2. Richard S J Tol, 2018. "The Economic Impacts of Climate Change," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 12(1), pages 4-25.
    3. Richard S.J. Tol & Thomas E. Downing & Samuel Fankhauser & Richard G. Richels & Joel B. Smith, 2001. "Progress In Estimating The Marginal Costs Of Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Working Papers FNU-4, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jan 2001.
    4. Seo, Niggol & Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Kurukulasuriya, Pradeep & Hassan, Rashid, 2008. "Long-term adaptation : selecting farm types across agro-ecological zones in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4602, The World Bank.
    5. S. Fankhauser & R. Tol, 1997. "The social costs of climate change: The IPCC second assessment report and beyond," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 1(4), pages 385-403, December.
    6. Richard S.J. Tol & Samuel Fankhauser & Richard G. Richels & Joel B. Smith, 2000. "How Much Damage Will Climate Change Do? Recent Estimates," Working Papers FNU-2, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Sep 2000.
    7. Wietze Lise & Richard S.J. Tol, 2000. "Impact of Climate on Tourist Demand," Working Papers FNU-1, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Aug 2000.
    8. Joelle SAAD-LESSLER & George TSELIOUDES, 2009. "Storms, Climate Change, and the US Economy: A National Analysis," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(1).
    9. Cynthia Rosenzweig & Francesco Tubiello, 2007. "Adaptation and mitigation strategies in agriculture: an analysis of potential synergies," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(5), pages 855-873, June.
    10. Kolstad, Charles D. & Kelly, David L. & Mitchell, Glenn, 1999. "Adjustment Costs from Environmental Change Induced by Incomplete Information and Learning," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt9mx119gc, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate; agriculture; land productivity; land prices;

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • R32 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Other Spatial Production and Pricing Analysis
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment

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