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Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

  • Shaheen, Susan A.
  • Bejamin-Chung, Jade
  • Allen, Denise
  • Howe-Steiger, Linda
Registered author(s):

    Continuing its role as a leader in air pollution policymaking, California led the nation by passing the first global warming legislation in the U.S.: the Global Warming Solutions Act or Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32). The legislation requires California to decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 (approximately a 27 percent reduction) using an enforceable statewide target to be phased in beginning in 2012. In addition, in 2005 Governor Schwarzenegger issued Executive Order S-3-05, which charges California with the task of reducing GHG emissions to 2000 levels by 2010, reducing emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, and reducing emissions to 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. This report represents a body of work conducted to assist the State of California in its efforts to develop a plan to achieve the emission targets set forth by AB 32. This research includes a literature review, expert interviews, and regional stakeholder workshops to identify and explore possible policy processes (e.g., cap and trade, budgets, feebates, etc.), mechanisms (e.g., smart growth and ITS), and strategies that could be employed to meet AB 32's GHG reduction goals.

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    Paper provided by Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis in its series Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series with number qt8bm4t7w5.

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    Date of creation: 01 Oct 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:cdl:itsdav:qt8bm4t7w5
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    1. Neil Strachan, 2007. "Setting greenhouse gas emission targets under baseline uncertainty: the Bush Climate Change Initiative," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 455-470, May.
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    15. Osborne, Tracey & Kiker, Clyde, 2005. "Carbon offsets as an economic alternative to large-scale logging: a case study in Guyana," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 481-496, March.
    16. Eric W. Welch & Allan Mazur & Stuart Bretschneider, 2000. "Voluntary behavior by electric utilities: Levels of adoption and contribution of the climate challenge program to the reduction of carbon dioxide," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 407-425.
    17. Reimund Schwarze & Peter Zapfel, 2000. "Sulfur Allowance Trading and the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market: A Comparative Design Analysis of two Major Cap-and-Trade Permit Programs?," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 17(3), pages 279-298, November.
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