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Human Capital and Economic Growth: Pakistan, 1960-2003

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Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between human capital and economic growth in Pakistan with time series data. Estimated with the Johansen (1991) approach, the aggregate production function rejects one version of the endogenous growth formulation. But the fitted model indicates that the output elasticity of human capital may be expected to increase with foreign technical progress. Higher productivity of secondary schooling than in OECD economies is consistent with the low levels so far attained in Pakistan. High returns to health spending compare very favourably with industrial investment. Human capital is estimated to have accounted for just under one fifth of the increase in GDP per head, a figure that is probably biased downwards because of the unmeasured dimensions of human capital.

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  • Abbas, Qaisar & Foreman-Peck, James, 2007. "Human Capital and Economic Growth: Pakistan, 1960-2003," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2007/22, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section, revised Dec 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2007/22
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    Cited by:

    1. Mussarat Khadija Khan, 2016. "Contribution of female human capital in economic growth: an empirical analysis of Pakistan (1972–2012)," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 709-728, March.
    2. Audi, Marc & Ali, Amjad, 2017. "Socio-Economic Development, Demographic Changes and Total Labor Productivity in Pakistan: A Co-Integrational and Decomposition Analysis," MPRA Paper 77538, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Sultan, Faisal & Tehseen, Syed & Arif, Imtiaz, 2009. "Human Capital and Economic Growth: The Quest for the Most Relevant Level of Education in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 59181, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Syed Ammad Ali & Qazi Masood Ahmed & Lubna Naz, 2016. "Public spending on human capital formation and economic growth in Pakistan," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 23(1), pages 1-20, June.
    5. Faisal Sultan Qadri, Faisal & Dr. Abdul Waheed, Waheed, 2011. "Human Capital and Economic Growth: Time Series Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 30654, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Jalil, Abdul & Idrees, Muhammad, 2013. "Modeling the impact of education on the economic growth: Evidence from aggregated and disaggregated time series data of Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 383-388.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Capital; Economic Growth; Cointegration; Pakistan;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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