IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cbr/cbrwps/wp337.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Multinationals in their communities: A social capital approach to corporate citizenship projects

Author

Listed:
  • Ian Jones
  • Michael Pollitt
  • David Bek

Abstract

The objectives of this research are to provide new ways of thinking about and measuring the extent and effectiveness of multinational company efforts to contribute to society via their corporate citizenship (CC) (or corporate social responsibility - CSR) programmes. It uses as its method of analysis the emerging literature relating to the theory and measurement of social capital. The paper summarises the findings of a forthcoming book (from Palgrave, 2007). We begin by discussing the concept of corporate citizenship in the context of the multinational. We go on to introduce the concept of social capital employed in the study. Next we summarise our case study evidence with cases from Anglo American and Diageo. Following this, we review our statistical and econometric analysis which maps the community engagements of UK multinationals in South Africa, US multinationals in Mexico and EU multinationals in Poland. We demonstrate the usefulness for analysis of social capital thinking in this context and make suggestions for future work.

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Jones & Michael Pollitt & David Bek, 2006. "Multinationals in their communities: A social capital approach to corporate citizenship projects," Working Papers wp337, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp337
    Note: PRO-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/centre-for-business-research/downloads/working-papers/wp337.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paldam, Martin, 2000. " Social Capital: One or Many? Definition and Measurement," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(5), pages 629-653, December.
    2. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    3. I Jones & C.M Nyland & M.G Pollitt, 2001. "How do Multinationals Build Social Capital? Evidence from South Africa," Working Papers wp220, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    4. David Bek & Ian W Jones & Michael J Pollitt, 2005. "How do Multinationals Build Social Capital? Diageo's Corporate Citizenship Programme," Working Papers wp302, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
    6. Ian W. Jones & Chris M. Nyland & Michael G. Pollitt, 2004. "Multinationals in Developing Communities: how EU Multinationals build Social Capital in Poland," Working Papers wp285, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Ian Jones & Michael Pollitt & Chris Nyland, 2002. "How do multinationals build social capital? Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers wp249, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bojana Radovanovic & Filip Brkovic & Slavica Stevanovic, 2011. "Corporate Social Responsibility as a Tool for Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive Growth," Book Chapters, Institute of Economic Sciences.
    2. Ioanna Boulouta & Christos Pitelis, 2014. "Who Needs CSR? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on National Competitiveness," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 119(3), pages 349-364, February.
    3. Felix Martin, 2011. "Human Development and the Pursuit of the Common Good: Social Psychology or Aristotelian Virtue Ethics?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 100(1), pages 89-98, March.
    4. Peter Heslam & Ian Jones & Michael Pollitt, 2009. "How a Social Capital Approach can help Multinationals show Ethical Leadership," Working Papers wp388, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    5. Ian W. Jones & Michael G. Pollitt, 2016. "How UK Banks are Changing Their Corporate Culture & Practice Following the Financial Crisis of 2007-08," Working Papers wp482, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    6. Zivka Przulj & Bojana Radovanovic, 2012. "Affirmation of Principles and Improved Corporate Governance in Serbia - Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility," Book Chapters, Institute of Economic Sciences.
    7. Klein, Peter G. & Mahoney, Joseph T. & McGahan, Anita M. & Pitelis, Christos N., 2009. "Toward a Theory of Public Entrepreneurship," Working Papers 09-0106, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Business.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social capital; Corporate citizenship; Corporate Social Responsibility; Multinational companies.;

    JEL classification:

    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp337. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ruth Newman and Georgie Cohen). General contact details of provider: http://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.