IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cbr/cbrwps/wp174.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Capabilities, Spontaneous Order, And Social Rights

Author

Listed:
  • Simon Deakin
  • Frank Wilkinson

Abstract

This paper explores the legal and normative implications of the idea that the labour market is a spontaneous order or self-organising system which rests on set of mutually-reinforcing conventions which are themselves the outcome of an evolutionary process. It is suggested that the role of self-enforcing norms and conventions cannot be separated from that of more formal mechanisms of legal regulation and intervention (judicial decisions, legislation, collective self-regulation). These formal mechanisms can operate to change the 'architecture' or parameters within which the conventions of the market evolve, and in so doing can influence the path of social and economic development. In this vein, it is suggested social rights, far from being inimical to the effective functioning of the labour market, are actually at the core of a labour market in which the resources available to society, in the form of the potential labour power of its members, are fully realised. Social rights should be understood as institutionalised forms of capabilities which provide individuals with the means to realise the potential of their resource endowments and thereby achieve a higher level of economic functioning.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Deakin & Frank Wilkinson, 2000. "Capabilities, Spontaneous Order, And Social Rights," Working Papers wp174, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp174
    Note: PRO-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/centre-for-business-research/downloads/working-papers/wp174.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lessig, Lawrence, 1998. "The New Chicago School," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 661-691, June.
    2. Humphries, Jane, 1977. "Class Struggle and the Persistence of the Working-Class Family," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(3), pages 241-258, September.
    3. repec:mes:jeciss:v:30:y:1996:i:4:p:1212-1216 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:sae:niesru:v:161:y::i:1:p:69-83 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. H. Peyton Young, 1996. "The Economics of Convention," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 105-122, Spring.
    6. William Brown & Simon Deakin & Paul Ryan, 1997. "The Effects of British Industrial Relations Legislation 1979-97," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 161(1), pages 69-83, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Colm McLaughlin, 2007. "The productivity enhancing Impacts of the Minimum Wage: Lessons from Denmark, New Zealand and Ireland," Working Papers wp342, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. Colm McLaughlin, 2009. "The Productivity-Enhancing Impacts of the Minimum Wage: Lessons from Denmark and New Zealand," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(2), pages 327-348, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capabilities; spontaneous order; employment legislation;

    JEL classification:

    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp174. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ruth Newman and Georgie Cohen). General contact details of provider: http://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.