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Are Married Women Secondary Workers? The Evolution of Married Women's Labor Supply in the U.S. from 1983 to 2000: Working Paper 2005-11

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  • Kyoo-il Kim
  • José Carlos Rodríguez-Pueblita

Abstract

Applying several estimation procedures to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we find that labor supply elasticities with respect to own wages and to other household members’ income for married white women have decreased significantly in absolute terms during the 1983-2000 period. The elasticities with respect to after-tax wages are statistically either not different from zero or negative, while the elasticities with respect to other household members’ income are negative, significant, and relatively stable for much of the period. Our results are robust and consistent across models and

Suggested Citation

  • Kyoo-il Kim & José Carlos Rodríguez-Pueblita, 2005. "Are Married Women Secondary Workers? The Evolution of Married Women's Labor Supply in the U.S. from 1983 to 2000: Working Paper 2005-11," Working Papers 17570, Congressional Budget Office.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbo:wpaper:17570
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