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Contacts, Altruism and Competing Externalities

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  • Toxvaerd, F.M.O.

Abstract

This paper considers voluntary transmissive contacts between partially altruistic individuals in the presence of asymptomatic infection. Two different types of externalities from contacts are considered, infection externalities and socioeconomic externalities. When contacts are incidental, then externalities work through disease propagation. When contacts are essential, both infection and socioeconomic externalities are present. It is shown that for incidental contacts, equilibrium involves suboptimally high exposure whereas for essential contacts, equilibrium exposure is suboptimally low. An increase in altruism may thus increase or decrease disease transmission, depending on the type of contact under consideration. The analysis implies that policy to manage the epidemic should differentiate between different types of tranmissive activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Toxvaerd, F.M.O., 2021. "Contacts, Altruism and Competing Externalities," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2135, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:2135
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Epidemics; altruism; infection externalities; socioeconomic externalities; disease control;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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