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Digitale Soziale Marktwirtschaft: Probleme und Reformoptionen im Kontext der Expansion der Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie Abstract: Dieser Beitrag untersucht wichtige Charakteristika der digitalen Wirtschaftsgesellschaft bzw. des Sektors der Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie (I&K). Dabei wird die Rolle von I&K als Querschnittstechnologie und die Problematik von Informationsunvollkommenheiten und Netzwerkeffekten hervorgehoben; sowie sich daraus ergebende Folgeeffekte. Präsentiert wird eine Hypothese über die Erhöhung der Nord-Süd-Einkommensunterschiede in der digitalen Weltwirtschaft. Zudem werden ausgewählte Phänomene der digitalen Wirtschaft thematisiert. Insgesamt wird als Konsequenz eine Digitale Soziale Marktwirtschaft als neues ordnungspolitisches Leitbild der OECD-Länder im 21. Jahrhundert entwickelt; für Deutschland und die EU ergeben sich erhebliche Reformerfordernisse

  • Paul J.J. Welfens


    (Europäisches Institut für Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen (EIIW))

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Paper provided by Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library in its series EIIW Discussion paper with number disbei123.

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Length: 43 Pages
Date of creation: Jun 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bwu:eiiwdp:disbei123
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  1. Bart van Ark, 2001. "The Renewal of the Old Economy: An International Comparative Perspective," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2001/5, OECD Publishing.
  2. Bart van Ark & Marcin Piatkowski, 2004. "Productivity, innovation and ICT in Old and New Europe," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 215-246, January.
  3. Yannis Bakos & Erik Brynjolfsson, 1999. "Bundling Information Goods: Pricing, Profits, and Efficiency," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(12), pages 1613-1630, December.
  4. Welfens, Paul JJ, 1995. "Telecommunications and transition in Central and Eastern Europe," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(7), pages 561-577, October.
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