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Blacking out

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  • Lengwiler, Yvan

    () (University of Basel)

Abstract

The partial shutdown of the economy following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the lack of measurements of economic activity that are available with a short lag and at high frequency. The consumption of electricity is a candidate for such a proxy.

Suggested Citation

  • Lengwiler, Yvan, 2020. "Blacking out," Working papers 2020/07, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2020/07
    as

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    File URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/76510/1/WWZ-WP-2020-07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Morten O. Ravn & Harald Uhlig, 2002. "On adjusting the Hodrick-Prescott filter for the frequency of observations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 371-375.
    2. J. Vernon Henderson & Adam Storeygard & David N. Weil, 2012. "Measuring Economic Growth from Outer Space," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(2), pages 994-1028, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    1. 19 Tage lang 1. August
      by admin in BATZ.ch on 2020-05-14 13:00:27

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; electricity; seasonal adjustment; weather data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts

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