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Price Dynamics in sequential auctions. New evidence using art auction data


  • L. Picci
  • A. E. Scorcu


We analyze the price structure of sequential auctions of modern and contemporary art that took place in Italy during the period 1983-96. Contrary to previous empirical studies, we do not find any “afternoon” effect - i.e., a decline of auction prices relative to their estimates. If anything, we find the opposite, or “morning”, effect. Our results are robust to different econometric specifications. Taking into consideration the possible dynamic nature of price determination, we propose an interpretation of the empirical results that encompasses previous contributions.

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  • L. Picci & A. E. Scorcu, 1999. "Price Dynamics in sequential auctions. New evidence using art auction data," Working Papers 352, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  • Handle: RePEc:bol:bodewp:352

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alan Beggs & Kathryn Graddy, 1997. "Declining Values and the Afternoon Effect: Evidence from Art Auctions," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(3), pages 544-565, Autumn.
    2. Robert Ekelund & Rand Ressler & John Watson, 1998. "Estimates, Bias and “No Sales” in Latin-American Art Auctions, 1977–1996," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(1), pages 33-42, March.
    3. Gale Ian L. & Hausch Donald B., 1994. "Bottom-Fishing and Declining Prices in Sequential Auctions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 318-331, November.
    4. von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik Morch, 1994. "Predatory Bidding in Sequential Auctions," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(3), pages 345-356, July.
    5. Ashenfelter, Orley & Genesove, David, 1992. "Testing for Price Anomalies in Real-Estate Auctions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 501-505, May.
    6. Gale, I. & Hausch, D., 1992. "Bottom-Fishing and Declining Prices in Sequential Auctions," Working papers 9215, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    7. McAfee R. Preston & Vincent Daniel, 1993. "The Declining Price Anomaly," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 191-212, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Guido Candela & Antonello Scorcu, 2001. "In Search of Stylized Facts on Art Market Prices: Evidence from the Secondary Market for Prints and Drawings in Italy," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 25(3), pages 219-231, August.

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