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Wealth effects: the French case

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  • Chauvin, V.
  • Damette, O.

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between consumption and wealth based on the concept of cointegration. The analysis focuses on French data over the 1987 - 2006 period. This relationship is expressed in two ways: in terms of Marginal Propensity to Consume out of wealth (MPC) and in terms of Elasticity of consumption to wealth. Three concepts of consumption are investigated: total households consumption expenditure, consumption excluding financial services and consumption excluding durable goods. Different estimators are also considered. Based on the MPC approach, when considered as permanent by households, an increase (decrease) in total wealth of one euro would lead to an increase (decrease) of 1 cent in total consumption. In terms of elasticity, an increase (de- crease) of 10% in wealth would imply also a relatively small impact of 0.8 to 1.1% on consumption depending on the concept of consumption considered. In most cases, the effect of a change in financial wealth is bigger than of a change in housing wealth. The results indicate that the wealth effects are smaller in France than in the UK and US but close to what is observed in Italy. In addition, any deviation of the variables from their common trends is corrected at first by adjustments in disposable income in line with what has been uncovered by studies on Germany and consistent with the "saving for the rainy days" approach of Campbell (1987). But our results contrast with the seminal study of Lettau and Ludvigson (2004) in the US where asset prices make the bulk of the adjustment.

Suggested Citation

  • Chauvin, V. & Damette, O., 2010. "Wealth effects: the French case," Working papers 276, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:276
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Igor Lebrun & Esther Pérez Ruiz, 2015. "Demand patterns in France, Germany and Belgium: Can We Explain the Differences?," EcoMod2015 8314, EcoMod.
    2. Igor Lebrun & Esther Perez Ruiz, 2014. "Demand Patterns in France, Germany, and Belgium; Can We Explain the Differences?," IMF Working Papers 14/165, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Luc Aroondel & Frédérique Savignac & Kévin Tracol, 2014. "Wealth and Consumption: French Households in the Crisis," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(3), pages 163-204, September.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2016. "France; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 16/228, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Antoine Bonleu & Gilbert Cette & Guillaume Horny, 2013. "Capital utilization and retirement," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(24), pages 3483-3494, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption; wealth effect; France.;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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