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Disaggregate Wealth and Aggregate Consumption: an Investigation of Empirical Relationships for the G7

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  • Joseph P. Byrne
  • E. Philip Davis

Abstract

To date, studies of wealth effects on consumption have mainly used aggregate wealth definitions on a single-country basis. This study seeks to break new ground by analysing disaggregated financial wealth in consumption functions for G7 countries. Contrary to earlier empirical work, we find that illiquid financial wealth (i.e. securities, pensions and mortgage debt) tends to be a more important long-run determinant of consumption than liquid financial wealth. These results imply potential instability in consumption functions employing aggregate wealth. Our results are robust using SURE; when testing with a nested specification; and when using a linear model. Copyright 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph P. Byrne & E. Philip Davis, 2003. "Disaggregate Wealth and Aggregate Consumption: an Investigation of Empirical Relationships for the G7," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(2), pages 197-220, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:65:y:2003:i:2:p:197-220
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    Cited by:

    1. Gerhard Illing & Ulrich Klüh, 2005. "Vermögenspreise und Konsum: Neue Erkenntnisse, amerikanische Erfahrungen und europäische Herausforderungen," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(1), pages 1-22, February.
    2. Gerlach-Kristen, Petra & O'Connell, Brian & O'Toole, Conor, 2013. "How do banking crises affect aggregate consumption? Evidence from international crisis episodes," Papers WP464, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Jakob B Madsen & Hui Yao, 2012. "Wealth Effects In Consumption: The Financial Accelerator And Banks’ Willingness To Lend," Monash Economics Working Papers 56-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    4. Barrell, Ray & Davis, E. Philip & Pomerantz, Olga, 2006. "Costs of financial instability, household-sector balance sheets and consumption," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 194-216, June.
    5. Vittorio Peretti & Rangan Gupta & Roula Inglesi-Lotz, 2012. "Do House Prices Impact Consumption and Interest Rate in South Africa? Evidence from a Time-Varying Vector Autoregressive Model," Working Papers 201216, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    6. Riccardo De Bonis & Andrea Silvestrini, 2012. "The effects of financial and real wealth on consumption: new evidence from OECD countries," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(5), pages 409-425, March.
    7. Christopher D. Carroll & Misuzu Otsuka & Jiri Slacalek, 2011. "How Large Are Housing and Financial Wealth Effects? A New Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 55-79, February.
    8. Illing, Gerhard & Klüh, Ulrich, 2004. "Vermögenspreise und Konsum," Discussion Papers in Economics 316, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    9. Barrell, Ray & Costantini, Mauro & Meco, Iris, 2015. "Housing wealth, financial wealth, and consumption: New evidence for Italy and the UK," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 316-323.
    10. Aron, Janine & Muellbauer, John & Murphy, Anthony, 2006. "Housing wealth, credit conditions and consumption," MPRA Paper 24485, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Mansor H. Ibrahim & Muzafar Shah Habibullah, 2010. "Stock market and aggregate consumption asymmetry: evidence from Malaysia," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 19-29, March.
    12. Christopher D. Carroll & Misuzu Otsuka & Jirka Slacalek, 2006. "How Large Is the Housing Wealth Effect? A New Approach," NBER Working Papers 12746, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Beatrice D. Simo-Kengne & Rangan Gupta & Manoel Bittencourt, 2013. "The Impact of House Prices on Consumption in South Africa: Evidence from Provincial-Level Panel VARs," Housing Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(8), pages 1133-1154, November.
    14. Swamy, Vighneswara, 2017. "Wealth Effects and Macroeconomic Dynamics – Evidence from Indian Economy," MPRA Paper 76836, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Hu, Haoshen & Kaspereit, Thomas & Prokop, Jörg, 2016. "The information content of issuer rating changes: Evidence for the G7 stock markets," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 99-108.
    16. Chauvin, V. & Damette, O., 2010. "Wealth effects: the French case," Working papers 276, Banque de France.
    17. Vincent Labhard & Gabriel Sterne & Chris Young, 2005. "Wealth and consumption: an assessment of the international evidence," Bank of England working papers 275, Bank of England.
    18. John N. Muellbauer, 2007. "Housing, credit and consumer expenditure," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 267-334.
    19. Luís Pacheco & José Barata, 2005. "Residential and Stock Market Effects on Consumption across Europe," European Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 255-278, December.
    20. Michael R. Donihue & Andriy Avramenko, 2006. "Decomposing consumer wealth effects: evidence on the role of real estate assets following the wealth cycle of 1990-2002," Working Papers 06-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    21. repec:seb:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:63-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Clancy, Daragh & Cussen, Mary & Lydon, Reamonn, 2014. "Housing Market Activity and Consumption: Macro and Micro Evidence," Research Technical Papers 13/RT/14, Central Bank of Ireland.

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