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CBDC and Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Mohammad Davoodalhosseini
  • Francisco Rivadeneyra
  • Yu Zhu

Abstract

Improving the conduct of monetary policy is unlikely to be the main motivation for central banks to issue a central bank digital currency (CBDC). While some argue that a CBDC could allow more complex transfer schemes or the ability to break below the zero lower bound, we find these benefits might be small or difficult to realize in practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammad Davoodalhosseini & Francisco Rivadeneyra & Yu Zhu, 2020. "CBDC and Monetary Policy," Staff Analytical Notes 2020-4, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocsan:20-4
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    File URL: https://www.bankofcanada.ca/2020/02/staff-analytical-note-2020-4/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mohammad Davoodalhosseini & Francisco Rivadeneyra, 2018. "A Policy Framework for E-Money: A Report on Bank of Canada Research," Discussion Papers 18-5, Bank of Canada.
    2. Jonathan Chiu & Mohammad Davoodalhosseini & Janet Hua Jiang & Yu Zhu, 2019. "Bank Market Power and Central Bank Digital Currency: Theory and Quantitative Assessment," Staff Working Papers 19-20, Bank of Canada.
    3. Thomas Laubach, 2009. "New Evidence on the Interest Rate Effects of Budget Deficits and Debt," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(4), pages 858-885, June.
    4. Brunnermeier, Markus K. & Niepelt, Dirk, 2019. "On the equivalence of private and public money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 27-41.
    5. Ruchir Agarwal & Miles Kimball, 2015. "Breaking Through the Zero Lower Bound," IMF Working Papers 2015/224, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fernández-Villaverde, Jesús & Schilling, Linda Marlene & Uhlig, Harald, 2020. "Central Bank Digital Currency: When Price and Bank Stability Collide," CEPR Discussion Papers 15555, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Young Sik Kim & Ohik Kwon, 2019. "Central Bank Digital Currency and Financial Stability," Working Papers 2019-6, Economic Research Institute, Bank of Korea.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Digital Currencies and Fintech; Monetary Policy; Payment clearing and settlement systems;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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