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Technology, Employment, and the Oil-Countries Business Cycle

  • Rodolfo Mendez-Marcano
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    On the ground of the significance and potential dual-nature of oil price shocks- they may act simultaneously like pure technology and pure expenditure shocks- in the context of the oil-countries-net oil-exporters with a substantial share of oil-income on their total export an/or fiscal-income. The paper questions the validity in such context of Gal s (1999) influential methodology for evaluating- so far, negatively- the empirical merits of it aimed to restore such validity by disentangling oil-price shocks from the rest of shocks. The comparison of the results from the application of both methodologies to Norway, Mexico, Russia, Trinidad&Tobago and Venezuela, besides supporting the dual-nature hypothesis and the necessity of such disentangling, proves the latter to be instrumental to get results consistent with Gal s (1999). Additionally, the paper unveil some startling facts about the effects of oil price shocks in this context remarkably, the prevalence of their technological-nature when oil-income has a higher weight on export than on fiscal-income, and of their expenditure-nature otherwise and shed some light on the influence of institutional reform on such effects.

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    Paper provided by BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department in its series Working Papers with number 1405.

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    Length: 73 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2014
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    Handle: RePEc:bbv:wpaper:1405
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    1. Christopher A. Sims & Tao Zha, 1994. "Error Bands for Impulse Responses," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1085, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
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      • Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Robert Vigfusson, 2007. "Assessing Structural VARs," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2006, Volume 21, pages 1-106 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    6. Kim, Sangho & Lim, Hyunjoon & Park, Donghyun, 2010. "Productivity and Employment in a Developing Country: Some Evidence from Korea," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 514-522, April.
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    10. David O. Cushman & Tao Zha, 1995. "Identifying monetary policy in a small open economy under flexible exchange rates," Working Paper 95-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    11. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Robert Vigfusson, 2003. "What Happens After a Technology Shock?," NBER Working Papers 9819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Galí, Jordi & Rabanal, Pau, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations: How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Post-War US Data?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4522, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    15. Hans-Ulrich Derlien & B. Guy Peters, 2008. "Introduction," Chapters, in: The State at Work, Volume 2, chapter 1 Edward Elgar.
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