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Inequality of Opportunity in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Paolo Brunori

    () (University of Bari)

  • Flaviana Palmisano

    () (University of Luxembourg)

  • Vito Peragine

    () (University of Bari)

Abstract

In the last decades inequality of opportunity has been extensively studied by economists, on the assumption that, in addition to being normatively undesirable, it can be related to low potential for growth. In this paper we evaluate inequality of opportunity in 11 Sub-Saharan Africa countries. According to our results, the portion of total inequality which can be attributed to exogenous circumstances is between 30% and 40% for the generality of countries considered. We also find a positive association between total consumption inequality and inequality of opportunity and we study the di?erent sources of unequal opportunities. Finally, we address a number of methodological issues that typically arise when measuring inequality of opportunity with imperfect data, which is the typical case in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Paolo Brunori & Flaviana Palmisano & Vito Peragine, 2015. "Inequality of Opportunity in Sub-Saharan Africa," SERIES 08-2015, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Dec 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:bai:series:series_wp_08-2015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marc Fleurbaey & Vito Peragine & Xavier Ramos, 2017. "Ex post inequality of opportunity comparisons," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(3), pages 577-603, December.
    2. Paul Hufe & Andreas Peichl & Daniel Weishaar, 2019. "Lower and Upper Bounds of Inequality of Opportunity in Emerging Economies," ifo Working Paper Series 301, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    3. repec:spr:sochwe:v:52:y:2019:i:4:d:10.1007_s00355-018-1165-x is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Brunori Paolo & Palmisano Flaviana & Peragine Vito, 2015. "Inequality of Opportunity During the Great Recession in Uganda," WIDER Working Paper Series 039, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Paolo Brunori & Vito Peragine & Laura Serlenga, 2019. "Upward and downward bias when measuring inequality of opportunity," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 52(4), pages 635-661, April.
    6. repec:oup:jafrec:v:27:y:2018:i:1:p:108-126. is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption inequality; Equality of opportunity; Sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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