IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ays/ispwps/paper0706.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Flat Rate Taxes; A Policy Note

Author

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to provide an assessment of flat tax policies for policy makers. To do this, the paper reviews the theoretical impacts of a flat tax - how might a flat tax affect a country's tax administration, revenue generation, and economy - as well as the experience of countries that have recently introduced flat taxes. This subject is particularly timely, since in recent years the ‘flat tax' has developed an aura as a panacea for some of the ills of tax policy and tax administration. In particular, it has been seen as a vehicle to simplify tax systems both in OECD countries, whose tax systems have become overly complicated with time, and in transition countries, as they have struggled to introduce western-style taxation systems. Some flat tax proponents argue that countries with a weak tax administration and/or those encumbered by complicated tax systems may benefit more from moving to a flat rate income tax than a major reform of its tax system, such as moving to a broader consumption based tax.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Hadler & Christine Moloi & Sally Wallace, 2007. "Flat Rate Taxes; A Policy Note," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0706, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper0706
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://icepp.gsu.edu/files/2015/03/ispwp0706.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ventura, Gustavo, 1999. "Flat tax reform: A quantitative exploration," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(9-10), pages 1425-1458, September.
    2. Calegari, Michael, 1998. "Flat Taxes and Effective Tax Planning," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 51(4), pages 689-713, December.
    3. Richard M. Bird & Eric M. Zolt, 2014. "Redistribution via Taxation: The Limited Role of the Personal Income Tax in Developing Countries," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 625-683, November.
    4. Bernd Genser, 2006. "The Dual Income Tax: Implementation and Experience in European Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0625, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    5. Howell H Zee & Vito Tanzi, 2001. "Tax Policy for Developing Countries," IMF Economic Issues 27, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Richard M. Bird & Eric M. Zolt, 2005. "Redistribution via Taxation: The Limited Role of the Personal Income Tax in Developing Countries (2005)," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0507, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    7. Sally Wallace, 2002. "Imputed an Presumptive Taxes: International Experiences and Lessons for Russia," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0203, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    8. Slemrod, Joel, 1997. "Deconstructing the Income Tax," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 151-155, May.
    9. Steven P. Cassou & Kevin J. Lansing, 2004. "Growth Effects of Shifting from a Graduated-rate Tax System to a Flat Tax," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(2), pages 194-213, April.
    10. Mun S. Ho & Kevin J. Stiroh, 1998. "Revenue, Progressivity, And The Flat Tax," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(1), pages 85-97, January.
    11. Calegari, Michael, 1998. "Flat Taxes and Effective Tax Planning," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 51(n. 4), pages 689-713, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Flat tax; Flat rax rate; tax system;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper0706. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Paul Benson). General contact details of provider: http://aysps.gsu.edu/isp/index.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.