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Empirical evidence of the gender pay gap in NZ

Author

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  • Gail Pacheco

    () (School of Economics, Faculty of Business, Economics, and Law, Auckland Univeristy of Technology)

  • Chao Li
  • Bill Cochrane

Abstract

Using recent data, and a variety of econometric techniques, this study examines the gender pay gap in New Zealand (NZ). The need for this study arises as the information that is regularly cited on the pay gap (based on average or median earnings for males and females) does not control for differences in individual, household, occupation, industry or other job characteristics, and there has been a lack of robust analysis in NZ, based on data post‐2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Gail Pacheco & Chao Li & Bill Cochrane, 2017. "Empirical evidence of the gender pay gap in NZ," Working Papers 2017-05, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201705
    as

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    File URL: http://www.aut.ac.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/729740/Economics-WP-2017-05.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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