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Smart City Governance in Developing Countries: A Systematic Literature Review

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  • Si Ying Tan
  • Araz Taeihagh

Abstract

Smart cities that make broad use of digital technologies have been touted as possible solutions for the population pressures faced by many cities in developing countries and may help meet the rising demand for services and infrastructure. Nevertheless, the high financial cost involved in infrastructure maintenance, the substantial size of the informal economies, and various governance challenges are curtailing government idealism regarding smart cities. This review examines the state of smart city development in developing countries, which includes understanding the conceptualisations, motivations, and unique drivers behind (and barriers to) smarty city development. A total of 56 studies were identified from a systematic literature review from an initial pool of 3928 social sciences literature identified from two academic databases. Data were analysed using thematic synthesis and thematic analysis. The review found that technology-enabled smart cities in developing countries can only be realised when concurrent socioeconomic, human, legal, and regulatory reforms are instituted. Governments need to step up their efforts to fulfil the basic infrastructure needs of citizens, raise more revenue, construct clear regulatory frameworks to mitigate the technological risks involved, develop human capital, ensure digital inclusivity, and promote environmental sustainability. A supportive ecosystem that encourages citizen participation, nurtures start-ups, and promotes public-private partnerships needs to be created to realise their smart city vision.

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  • Si Ying Tan & Araz Taeihagh, 2020. "Smart City Governance in Developing Countries: A Systematic Literature Review," Papers 2001.10173, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:2001.10173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Vu, Khuong & Hartley, Kris, 2018. "Promoting smart cities in developing countries: Policy insights from Vietnam," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(10), pages 845-859.
    2. Amy K. Glasmeier & Molly Nebiolo, 2016. "Thinking about Smart Cities: The Travels of a Policy Idea that Promises a Great Deal, but So Far Has Delivered Modest Results," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-11, November.
    3. Araz Taeihagh, 2017. "Crowdsourcing, Sharing Economies and Development," Journal of Developing Societies, , vol. 33(2), pages 191-222, June.
    4. Tassilo Herrschel, 2013. "Competitiveness AND Sustainability: Can ‘Smart City Regionalism’ Square the Circle?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 50(11), pages 2332-2348, August.
    5. Sheshadri Chatterjee & Arpan Kumar Kar & M. P. Gupta, 2018. "Alignment of IT Authority and Citizens of Proposed Smart Cities in India: System Security and Privacy Perspective," Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, Springer;Global Institute of Flexible Systems Management, vol. 19(1), pages 95-107, March.
    6. Rajesh Kumar Rai & Mani Nepal & Madan Singh Khadayat & Bishal Bhardwaj, 2019. "Improving Municipal Solid Waste Collection Services in Developing Countries: A Case of Bharatpur Metropolitan City, Nepal," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(11), pages 1-17, May.
    7. Wang, Yuanping & Ren, Hong & Dong, Liang & Park, Hung-Suck & Zhang, Yuepeng & Xu, Yanwei, 2019. "Smart solutions shape for sustainable low-carbon future: A review on smart cities and industrial parks in China," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 103-117.
    8. Paul Pierce & Francesca Ricciardi & Alessandro Zardini, 2017. "Smart Cities as Organizational Fields: A Framework for Mapping Sustainability-Enabling Configurations," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(9), pages 1-21, August.
    9. Mital, Monika & Chang, Victor & Choudhary, Praveen & Papa, Armando & Pani, Ashis K., 2018. "Adoption of Internet of Things in India: A test of competing models using a structured equation modeling approach," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 339-346.
    10. Ju, Jingrui & Liu, Luning & Feng, Yuqiang, 2018. "Citizen-centered big data analysis-driven governance intelligence framework for smart cities," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(10), pages 881-896.
    11. Kummitha, Rama Krishna Reddy & Crutzen, Nathalie, 2019. "Smart cities and the citizen-driven internet of things: A qualitative inquiry into an emerging smart city," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 44-53.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreea Orîndaru & Mihaela Constantinescu & Claudia-Elena Țuclea & Ștefan-Claudiu Căescu & Margareta Stela Florescu & Ionel Dumitru, 2020. "Rurbanization—Making the City Greener: Young Citizen Implication and Future Actions," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(17), pages 1-19, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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