IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/tefoso/v142y2019icp154-167.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Driving elements to make cities smarter: Evidences from European projects

Author

Listed:
  • Camboim, Guilherme Freitas
  • Zawislak, Paulo Antônio
  • Pufal, Nathália Amarante

Abstract

Industrial cities still maintain structures for a mass production and consumption dynamics, which result in several issues such as unemployment, homeless, traffic jams, pollution, diseases, violence and so on. This urban industrial configuration no longer fits with the value creation principles of the new techno-economic paradigm. In order to overcome this crisis, cities of the future must find suitable trajectories and become smart cities. However, there is no consensus about what really makes a city smarter. What are the elements that a smart city must have in order to offer high quality of life and a prosperous environment for creativity and innovation? This paper aims at disclosing the driving elements that make a city smarter, based on the literature, interviews with experts, and insights from smart cities projects (Amsterdam, Barcelona, Lisbon, Vienna). Results show that a smart city is an urban innovation ecosystem where knowledge easily flows from a deliberated interaction and collaboration among different stakeholders to create wealth, supported by a flexible institutional structure, an integrated-participative governance model, a digital-green infrastructure and a functional urban design with diversified amenities and facilities. We conclude that cities, to become smarter, should upgrade the elements related to their different dimensions, which are the techno-economic activity, the environ-urban configuration and the socio-institutional structures in an integrated manner, guided by an integrated and comprehensive governance model.

Suggested Citation

  • Camboim, Guilherme Freitas & Zawislak, Paulo Antônio & Pufal, Nathália Amarante, 2019. "Driving elements to make cities smarter: Evidences from European projects," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 154-167.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:142:y:2019:i:c:p:154-167
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2018.09.014
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040162517318607
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Malerba, Franco, 2002. "Sectoral systems of innovation and production," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 247-264, February.
    2. Tuba Bakıcı & Esteve Almirall & Jonathan Wareham, 2013. "A Smart City Initiative: the Case of Barcelona," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 4(2), pages 135-148, June.
    3. K. Matthias Weber & Bernhard Truffer, 2017. "Moving innovation systems research to the next level: towards an integrative agenda," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 101-121.
    4. Jan Eeckhout, 2004. "Gibrat's Law for (All) Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1429-1451, December.
    5. Jesse M. Shapiro, 2006. "Smart Cities: Quality of Life, Productivity, and the Growth Effects of Human Capital," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 324-335, May.
    6. Clarysse, Bart & Wright, Mike & Bruneel, Johan & Mahajan, Aarti, 2014. "Creating value in ecosystems: Crossing the chasm between knowledge and business ecosystems," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 1164-1176.
    7. Laurent Dupont & Laure Morel & Claudine Guidat, 2015. "Innovative public-private partnership to support Smart City: the case of “Chaire REVES”," Post-Print hal-01332233, HAL.
    8. Parvez Hayat, 2016. "Smart Cities: A Global Perspective," India Quarterly: A Journal of International Affairs, , vol. 72(2), pages 177-191, June.
    9. Michael R. Betz & Mark D. Partridge & Belal Fallah, 2016. "Smart cities and attracting knowledge workers: Which cities attract highly-educated workers in the 21st century?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(4), pages 819-841, November.
    10. José-Miguel Fernández-Güell & Marta Collado-Lara & Silvia Guzmán-Araña & Victoria Fernández-Añez, 2016. "Incorporating a Systemic and Foresight Approach into Smart City Initiatives: The Case of Spanish Cities," Journal of Urban Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 43-67, July.
    11. Cuberes David, 2009. "A Model of Sequential City Growth," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-41, May.
    12. Lee, Jung Hoon & Hancock, Marguerite Gong & Hu, Mei-Chih, 2014. "Towards an effective framework for building smart cities: Lessons from Seoul and San Francisco," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 80-99.
    13. Theo Papaioannou & David Wield & Joanna Chataway, 2009. "Knowledge Ecologies and Ecosystems? An Empirically Grounded Reflection on Recent Developments in Innovation Systems Theory," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 27(2), pages 319-339, April.
    14. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:3:p:207:d:64537 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Loet Leydesdorff, 2012. "The Triple Helix, Quadruple Helix, …, and an N-Tuple of Helices: Explanatory Models for Analyzing the Knowledge-Based Economy?," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 3(1), pages 25-35, March.
    16. Michael Storper & Anthony J. Venables, 2004. "Buzz: face-to-face contact and the urban economy," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 351-370, August.
    17. Ron A. Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2006. "Why is economic geography not an evolutionary science? Towards an evolutionary economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(3), pages 273-302, June.
    18. Dave Carter, 2013. "Urban Regeneration, Digital Development Strategies and the Knowledge Economy: Manchester Case Study," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 4(2), pages 169-189, June.
    19. Asheim, Bjorn T. & Coenen, Lars, 2005. "Knowledge bases and regional innovation systems: Comparing Nordic clusters," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1173-1190, October.
    20. Maria-Llu�sa Marsal-Llacuna & Maria-Beatriz L�pez-Ib��ez, 2014. "Smart Urban Planning: Designing Urban Land Use from Urban Time Use," Journal of Urban Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 39-56, January.
    21. Bjørn Asheim & Ron Boschma & Philip Cooke, 2011. "Constructing Regional Advantage: Platform Policies Based on Related Variety and Differentiated Knowledge Bases," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(7), pages 893-904.
    22. Shade T Shutters & Rachata Muneepeerakul & José Lobo, 2016. "Constrained pathways to a creative urban economy," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 53(16), pages 3439-3454, December.
    23. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:3:p:-:d:64537 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Sotiris Zygiaris, 2013. "Smart City Reference Model: Assisting Planners to Conceptualize the Building of Smart City Innovation Ecosystems," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 4(2), pages 217-231, June.
    25. Tassilo Herrschel, 2013. "Competitiveness AND Sustainability: Can ‘Smart City Regionalism’ Square the Circle?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 50(11), pages 2332-2348, August.
    26. Alberto Vanolo, 2014. "Smartmentality: The Smart City as Disciplinary Strategy," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 51(5), pages 883-898, April.
    27. Bjorn Asheim & Lars Coenen & Jerker Moodysson & Jan Vang, 2007. "Constructing knowledge-based regional advantage: implications for regional innovation policy," International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 7(2/3/4/5), pages 140-155.
    28. Carlota Perez, 2004. "Technological Revolutions, Paradigm Shifts and Socio-institutional Change," Chapters, in: Erik S. Reinert (ed.),Globalization, Economic Development and Inequality, chapter 7, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    29. Vito Albino & Umberto Berardi & Rosa Maria Dangelico, 2015. "Smart Cities: Definitions, Dimensions, Performance, and Initiatives," Journal of Urban Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 3-21, January.
    30. Lee, Jung Hoon & Phaal, Robert & Lee, Sang-Ho, 2013. "An integrated service-device-technology roadmap for smart city development," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 286-306.
    31. Ernest Miguélez & Rosina Moreno, 2014. "What Attracts Knowledge Workers? The Role Of Space And Social Networks," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 33-60, January.
    32. Nicos Komninos & Marc Pallot & Hans Schaffers, 2013. "Special Issue on Smart Cities and the Future Internet in Europe," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 4(2), pages 119-134, June.
    33. Robert J. Rogerson, 1999. "Quality of Life and City Competitiveness," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(5-6), pages 969-985, May.
    34. Paroutis, Sotirios & Bennett, Mark & Heracleous, Loizos, 2014. "A strategic view on smart city technology: The case of IBM Smarter Cities during a recession," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 262-272.
    35. Ron Boschma, 2005. "Proximity and Innovation: A Critical Assessment," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 61-74.
    36. Oh, Deog-Seong & Phillips, Fred & Park, Sehee & Lee, Eunghyun, 2016. "Innovation ecosystems: A critical examination," Technovation, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-6.
    37. Vanessa Thomas & Ding Wang & Louise Mullagh & Nick Dunn, 2016. "Where’s Wally? In Search of Citizen Perspectives on the Smart City," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-13, February.
    38. John V. Winters, 2011. "Why Are Smart Cities Growing? Who Moves And Who Stays," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 253-270, May.
    39. Lundvall, Bengt-Ake & Johnson, Bjorn & Andersen, Esben Sloth & Dalum, Bent, 2002. "National systems of production, innovation and competence building," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 213-231, February.
    40. Russell, Martha G. & Smorodinskaya, Nataliya V., 2018. "Leveraging complexity for ecosystemic innovation," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 114-131.
    41. Tsujimoto, Masaharu & Kajikawa, Yuya & Tomita, Junichi & Matsumoto, Yoichi, 2018. "A review of the ecosystem concept — Towards coherent ecosystem design," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 49-58.
    42. Walrave, Bob & Talmar, Madis & Podoynitsyna, Ksenia S. & Romme, A. Georges L. & Verbong, Geert P.J., 2018. "A multi-level perspective on innovation ecosystems for path-breaking innovation," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 103-113.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kummitha, Rama Krishna Reddy, 2020. "Why distance matters: The relatedness between technology development and its appropriation in smart cities," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 157(C).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:142:y:2019:i:c:p:154-167. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00401625 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.