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Partial correlation analysis: Applications for financial markets

  • Dror Y. Kenett
  • Xuqing Huang
  • Irena Vodenska
  • Shlomo Havlin
  • H. Eugene Stanley
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    The presence of significant cross-correlations between the synchronous time evolution of a pair of equity returns is a well-known empirical fact. The Pearson correlation is commonly used to indicate the level of similarity in the price changes for a given pair of stocks, but it does not measure whether other stocks influence the relationship between them. To explore the influence of a third stock on the relationship between two stocks, we use a partial correlation measurement to determine the underlying relationships between financial assets. Building on previous work, we present a statistically robust approach to extract the underlying relationships between stocks from four different financial markets: the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, and India. This methodology provides new insights into financial market dynamics and uncovers implicit influences in play between stocks. To demonstrate the capabilities of this methodology, we (i) quantify the influence of different companies and, by studying market similarity across time, present new insights into market structure and market stability, and (ii) we present a practical application, which provides information on the how a company is influenced by different economic sectors, and how the sectors interact with each other. These examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology in uncovering information valuable for a range of individuals, including not only investors and traders but also regulators and policy makers.

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    File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1402.1405
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    Paper provided by arXiv.org in its series Papers with number 1402.1405.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2014
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    Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1402.1405
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://arxiv.org/

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    1. Brock, W.A. & Hommes, C.H. & Wagener, F.O.O., 2006. "More hedging instruments may destabilize markets," CeNDEF Working Papers 06-12, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    2. Pollet, Joshua M. & Wilson, Mungo, 2010. "Average correlation and stock market returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(3), pages 364-380, June.
    3. Tumminello, Michele & Lillo, Fabrizio & Mantegna, Rosario N., 2010. "Correlation, hierarchies, and networks in financial markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 40-58, July.
    4. Kristin J. Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 2002. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Comovements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(5), pages 2223-2261, October.
    5. Andrew W. Lo & Craig A. MacKinlay, . "An Econometric Analysis of Nonsyschronous-Trading," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 19-89, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
    6. Engle, Robert, 2002. "Dynamic Conditional Correlation: A Simple Class of Multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(3), pages 339-50, July.
    7. Monica Billio & Mila Getmansky & Andrew W. Lo & Loriana Pelizzon, 2011. "Econometric Measures of Connectedness and Systemic Risk in the Finance and Insurance Sectors," Working Papers 2011_21, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    8. Krishnan, C.N.V. & Petkova, Ralitsa & Ritchken, Peter, 2009. "Correlation risk," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 353-367, June.
    9. Dimitrios Bisias & Mark Flood & Andrew W. Lo & Stavros Valavanis, 2012. "A Survey of Systemic Risk Analytics," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 255-296, October.
    10. Campbell, Rachel A.J. & Forbes, Catherine S. & Koedijk, Kees G. & Kofman, Paul, 2008. "Increasing correlations or just fat tails?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 287-309, March.
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