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A Group-Specific Measure of Intergenerational Persistence

Author

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  • Tom Hertz

Abstract

This paper outlines a decomposition technique that allows for inter-group comparisons of intergenerational persistence in economic status, for groups whose means are different. It takes account of both within- and between-group sources of the covariance of parents’ and children’s outcomes, and yields results that are quite different, and arguably more meaningful, than the simple comparison of within-group regression estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom Hertz, 2007. "A Group-Specific Measure of Intergenerational Persistence," Working Papers 2007-16, American University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:amu:wpaper:1607
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    File URL: http://w.american.edu/cas/economics/repec/amu/workingpapers/2007-16.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anders Björklund & Mikael Lindahl & Erik Plug, 2006. "The Origins of Intergenerational Associations: Lessons from Swedish Adoption Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(3), pages 999-1028.
    2. Bruce Sacerdote, 2007. "How Large are the Effects from Changes in Family Environment? A Study of Korean American Adoptees," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 119-157.
    3. Bjorklund, Anders & Chadwick, Laura, 2003. "Intergenerational income mobility in permanent and separated families," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 239-246, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Margo, Robert A., 2016. "Obama, Katrina, and the Persistence of Racial Inequality," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 76(02), pages 301-341, June.
    2. Piraino, Patrizio, 2015. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility and Equality of Opportunity in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 396-405.
    3. Nybom, Martin & Stuhler, Jan, 2014. "Interpreting Trends in Intergenerational Mobility," Working Paper Series 3/2014, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    4. Mehtabul Azam & Vipul Bhatt, 2015. "Like Father, Like Son? Intergenerational Educational Mobility in India," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(6), pages 1929-1959, December.
    5. Solon, Gary, 2017. "What Do We Know So Far about Multigenerational Mobility?," IZA Discussion Papers 10623, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Mazumder, Bhashkar, 2014. "Black–White Differences in Intergenerational Economic Mobility in the U.S," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 1-18.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational mobility; between-group decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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