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Environmental Compliance In U.S. Agricultural Policy: Past Performance And Future Potential

  • Claassen, Roger
  • Breneman, Vincent E.
  • Bucholtz, Shawn
  • Cattaneo, Andrea
  • Johansson, Robert C.
  • Morehart, Mitchell J.

Since 1985, U.S. agricultural producers have been required to practice soil conservation on highly erodible cropland and conserve wetlands as a condition of farm program eligibility. This report discusses the general characteristics of compliance incentives, evaluates their effectiveness in reducing erosion in the program's current form, and explores the potential for expanding the compliance approach to address nutrient runoff from crop production. While soil erosion has, in fact, been reduced on land subject to Conservation Compliance, erosion is also down on land not subject to Conservation Compliance, indicating the influence of other factors. Analysis to isolate the influence of Conservation Compliance incentives from other factors suggests that about 25 percent of the decline in soil erosion between 1982 and 1997 can be attributed to Conservation Compliance. This report also finds that compliance incentives have likely deterred conversion of noncropped highly erodible land and wetland to cropland, and that a compliance approach could be used effectively to address nutrient runoff from crop production.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34033
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Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Agricultural Economics Reports with number 34033.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34033
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  1. Douglas M. Larson & Gloria E. Helfand & Brett W. House, 1996. "Second-Best Tax Policies to Reduce Nonpoint Source Pollution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1108-1117.
  2. Ralph E. Heimlich, 1986. "cultural Programs and Cropland Conversion, 1975-1981," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 62(2), pages 174-181.
  3. Gollehon, Noel R. & Caswell, Margriet & Ribaudo, Marc & Kellogg, Robert L. & Lander, Charles & Letson, David, 2001. "Confined Animal Production And Manure Nutrients," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33763, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  4. Amacher, Gregory S. & Malik, Arun S., 1996. "Bargaining in Environmental Regulation and the Ideal Regulator," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 233-253, March.
  5. Ribaudo, Marc O. & Heimlich, Ralph & Claassen, Roger & Peters, Mark, 2001. "Least-cost management of nonpoint source pollution: source reduction versus interception strategies for controlling nitrogen loss in the Mississippi Basin," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 183-197, May.
  6. Ribaudo, Marc & Kaplan, Jonathan D. & Christensen, Lee A. & Gollehon, Noel R. & Johansson, Robert C. & Breneman, Vincent E. & Aillery, Marcel P. & Agapoff, Jean & Peters, Mark, 2003. "Manure Management For Water Quality Costs To Animal Feeding Operations Of Applying Manure Nutrients To Land," Agricultural Economics Reports 33911, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  7. Amacher, Gregory S. & Malik, Arun S., 1998. "Instrument Choice When Regulators and Firms Bargain," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 225-241, May.
  8. Heimlich, Ralph E. & Wiebe, Keith D. & Claassen, Roger & Gadsby, Dwight M. & House, Robert M., 1998. "Wetlands and Agriculture: Private Interests and Public Benefits," Agricultural Economics Reports 34043, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  9. Babcock, Bruce A., 1992. "Effects of Uncertainty on Optimal Nitrogen Applications (The)," Staff General Research Papers 10588, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  10. Claassen, Roger & Hansen, LeRoy T. & Peters, Mark & Breneman, Vincent E. & Weinberg, Marca & Cattaneo, Andrea & Feather, Peter & Gadsby, Dwight M. & Hellerstein, Daniel & Hopkins, Jeffrey W. & Johnsto, 2001. "Agri-Environmental Policy at the Crossroads: Guideposts on a Changing Landscape," Agricultural Economics Reports 33983, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  11. Feather, Peter & Hellerstein, Daniel & Hansen, LeRoy T., 1999. "Economic Valuation of Environmental Benefits and the Targeting of Conservation Programs: The Case of the CRP," Agricultural Economics Reports 34027, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  12. Johansson, Robert C., 2002. "Watershed Nutrient Trading Under Asymmetric Information," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 31(2), October.
  13. Malik Arun S., 1993. "Self-Reporting and the Design of Policies for Regulating Stochastic Pollution," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 241-257, May.
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