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The U.S. Rice Industry

Author

Listed:
  • Setia, Parveen
  • Childs, Nathan
  • Wailes, Eric
  • Livezey, Janet

Abstract

The U.S. rice industry, which includes farmers, handlers, dryers, millers, processors, and traders, is more vertically integrated than other grain markets. The industry has over 300 years of history in the United States and has shown itself adaptable to changes in technology, regional advantage, export markets, environmental concerns, and consumer taste. Although producing only 1 to 2 percent of the world crop, the United States accounts for 16 to 17 percent of world rice trade. About half the U.S. crop is exported each year to diverse markets in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and Canada. Rice production accounts for less than 1 percent of field crop value in the United States. It is more capital-intensive than other grain crops and rice farms are larger than other grain farms. Production is concentrated in six States. Important factors affecting the future of the U.S. rice industry include: the opening of world markets, environmental legislation, new uses for byproducts, and greater income growth in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Setia, Parveen & Childs, Nathan & Wailes, Eric & Livezey, Janet, 1994. "The U.S. Rice Industry," Agricultural Economic Reports 305473, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:305473
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.305473
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/305473/files/aer700.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Warren R. Grant, 1970. "Application of an Economic Model for Evaluating Government Program Costs for Rice," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 52(2), pages 209-215.
    2. Brorsen, B. Wade & Grant, Warren R. & Rister, M. Edward, 1988. "Some Effects of Rice Quality on Rough Rice Prices," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 131-140, July.
    3. Michael Boehlje & Steven Griffin, 1979. "Financial Impacts of Government Support Price Programs," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 61(2), pages 285-296.
    4. Bruce Gardner, 1983. "Efficient Redistribution through Commodity Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 65(2), pages 225-234.
    5. T. D. Wallace, 1962. "Measures of Social Costs of Agricultural Programs," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 44(2), pages 580-594.
    6. Dismukes, Robert, 1988. "U.S. Rice Farms: A Regional Comparison," Staff Reports 278006, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Elam, Emmett W. & Holder, Shelby H., 1985. "An Evaluation of the Rice Outlook and Situation Price Forecasts," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 155-162, December.
    8. Siamwalla, Ammar & Haykin, Stephen, 1983. "The world rice market: structure, conduct, and performance," Research reports 39, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Elam, Emmett W. & Holder, Shelby H., 1985. "An Evaluation Of The Rice Outlook And Situation Price Forecasts," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 17(2), pages 1-7, December.
    10. B. Wade Brorsen & Warren R. Grant & M. Edward Rister, 1984. "A Hedonic Price Model for Rough Rice Bid/Acceptance Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 66(2), pages 156-163.
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