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Concessions and Exemptions for Developing Countries in the Agricultural Negotiations: The Role of the Special and Differential Treatment

Author

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  • Bureau, Jean-Christophe
  • Jean, Sebastien
  • Matthews, Alan

Abstract

The main provisions of the special and differential treatment (SDT) granted to developing countries in the agriculture and food sector under the present World Trade Organization agreements are presented. The different provisions seem to have had a limited impact on developing countries, and revision is needed. The positions of the various developing countries regarding the SDT in the negotiations are summarized. Recent simulations of the consequences of a plausible agreement under the Doha negotiations suggest that there is a case for a special treatment for poorest countries, but also for a subset of countries that are likely to lose at multilateral liberalization, because of the erosion of existing preferences. Suggestions are made in order to make special and differential treatment provisions more effective. While direct assistance could play a role, a revised system of preferences could deserves some attention.

Suggested Citation

  • Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Jean, Sebastien & Matthews, Alan, 2005. "Concessions and Exemptions for Developing Countries in the Agricultural Negotiations: The Role of the Special and Differential Treatment," Working Papers 18858, TRADEAG - Agricultural Trade Agreements.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:tragwp:18858
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/18858
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Jean, S Bastien & Matthews, Alan, 2006. "The consequences of agricultural trade liberalization for developing countries: distinguishing between genuine benefits and false hopes," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(02), pages 225-249, July.
    2. Alan Matthews, 2005. "Special and Differential Treatment in the WTO Agricultural Negotiations," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp061, IIIS.
    3. William R. Cline, 2004. "Trade Policy and Global Poverty," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 379.
    4. Antoine Bouët & Lionel Fontagné & Sébastien Jean, 2005. "Is Erosion of Tariff Preferences a Serious Concern?," Working Papers 2005-14, CEPII research center.
    5. Mohamed Hedi Bchir & Sébastien Jean & David Laborde, 2006. "Binding Overhang and Tariff-Cutting Formulas," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(2), pages 207-232, July.
    6. Bernard Hoekman & Francis Ng & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2002. "Eliminating Excessive Tariffs on Exports of Least Developed Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(1), pages 1-21, June.
    7. Alan Matthews, 2002. "Les pays en développement et les négociations de l'OMC sur la libéralisation des échanges agricoles," Économie rurale, Programme National Persée, vol. 267(1), pages 5-18.
    8. Fabien Candau & Sébastien Jean, 2005. "What Are EU Trade Preferences Worth for Sub-Saharan Africa and Other Developing Countries?," Working Papers 2005-19, CEPII research center.
    9. Antoine Bouët & Jean-Christophe Bureau & Yvan Decreux & Sébastien Jean, 2005. "Multilateral Agricultural Trade Liberalisation: The Contrasting Fortunes of Developing Countries in the Doha Round," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(9), pages 1329-1354, September.
    10. Will Martin & Kym Anderson, 2006. "Agricultural Trade Reform and the Doha Development Agenda," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6889.
    11. Gibson, Paul R. & Wainio, John & Whitley, Daniel B. & Bohman, Mary, 2001. "Profiles Of Tariffs In Global Agricultural Markets," Agricultural Economics Reports 34055, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    12. Richard Pomfret, 2005. "Regional Trade Agreements," International Trade 0511002, EconWPA.
    13. Arvind Panagariya, 2002. "EU Preferential Trade Arrangements and Developing Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(10), pages 1415-1432, November.
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