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Farm Market Patron Behavioral Response to Food Sampling

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  • Yang, Shang-Ho
  • Woods, Timothy A.

Abstract

This study examines farm market patron responses to food sampling experiences and provides a baseline of regional differences of consumer interest in various products selling in the farmers market. Results show that the sampling strategy can highly engage consumers’ attention and easy to spread the product information. Food sampling showed a number of immediate product purchasing impacts, as well as other behaviors positively impacting vendor sales. The most important reason patrons identified that encouraged them to try a sample was friendliness of vendors. Sampling is a highly experiential merchandising strategy that fits in well with the farm market venue. More than half of the patrons indicated actually purchasing after sampling that were not planning to buy the product that day before the food sampling.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang, Shang-Ho & Woods, Timothy A., 2013. "Farm Market Patron Behavioral Response to Food Sampling," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 146711, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea13:146711
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/146711/files/Latest%20SAEA%20Manuscript%203-22-2013.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yang, Shang-Ho & Hu, Wuyang & Mupandawana, Malvern & Liu, Yun, 2012. "Consumer Willingness to Pay for Fair Trade Coffee: A Chinese Case Study," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-14, February.
    2. Celsi, Richard L & Olson, Jerry C, 1988. " The Role of Involvement in Attention and Comprehension Processes," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 210-224, September.
    3. Bone, Paula Fitzgerald, 1995. "Word-of-mouth effects on short-term and long-term product judgments," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 213-223, March.
    4. Herr, Paul M & Kardes, Frank R & Kim, John, 1991. " Effects of Word-of-Mouth and Product-Attribute Information on Persuasion: An Accessibility-Diagnosticity Perspective," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 454-462, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Community/Rural/Urban Development; Consumer/Household Economics; Marketing;

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