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Consumer Acceptance Of Food Biotechnology: Willingness To Buy Genetically Modified Food Products

Author

Listed:
  • Hossain, Ferdaus
  • Onyango, Benjamin M.
  • Adelaja, Adesoji O.
  • Schilling, Brian J.
  • Hallman, William K.

Abstract

Biotechnology is often viewed as the defining technology for the future of food and agriculture with the potential to deliver a wide range of economic and health benefits. Public acceptance of genetically modified food products is a critical factor for this emerging technology. Using data from a national survey, this study examines public acceptance of food biotechnology by modeling consumers' willingness to buy genetically modified foods. Empirical results suggest that younger, white, male and college educated individuals are more likely to accept food biotechnology. Public confidence in scientists, corporations, as well as government has significant effects on consumer acceptance of food biotechnology. While religious views influence consumer acceptance of food biotechnology, income and social/political orientations do not have significant effects. Empirical results indicate regional differences in the acceptance of genetically modified foods.

Suggested Citation

  • Hossain, Ferdaus & Onyango, Benjamin M. & Adelaja, Adesoji O. & Schilling, Brian J. & Hallman, William K., 2002. "Consumer Acceptance Of Food Biotechnology: Willingness To Buy Genetically Modified Food Products," Working Papers 18169, Rutgers University, Food Policy Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:rutfwp:18169
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/18169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lusk, Jayson L. & Daniel, M. Scott & Mark, Darrell R. & Lusk, Christine L., 2001. "Alternative Calibration And Auction Institutions For Predicting Consumer Willingess To Pay For Nongenetically Modified Corn Chips," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(01), July.
    2. Baker, Gregory A. & Burnham, Thomas A., 2001. "Consumer Response To Genetically Modified Foods: Market Segment Analysis And Implications For Producers And Policy Makers," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.
    3. Miranowski, John A. & Moschini, Giancarlo & Babcock, Bruce A. & Duffy, Michael & Wisner, Robert & Beghin, John C. & Hayes, Dermot J. & Lence, Sergio H & Baumel, C. Phillip & Harl, Neil E., 1998. "Economic Perspectives on GMO Market Segregation," ISU General Staff Papers 199801010800001297, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Moon, Wanki & Balasubramanian, Siva K., 2001. "A Multi-Attribute Model Of Public Acceptance Of Genetically Modified Organisms," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20745, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Antonopoulou, Lina & Papadas, Christos T. & Targoutzidis, Antonis, 2009. "The Impact Of Socio-Demographic Factors And Political Perceptions On Consumer Attitudes Towards Genetically Modified Foods: An Econometric Investigation," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(2), June.

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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics;

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