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Scarcity Of Canterbury’s Water: Its Multiple, Conflicting Uses

Author

Listed:
  • Miller, Sini
  • Tait, Peter
  • Saunders, Caroline

Abstract

Canterbury freshwater management is the focus of important decisions with significant challenges. Applying choice modelling, this study explores how Canterbury residents value freshwater attributes related to environmental, economic, social and cultural elements of wellbeing. In particular, this study explores how values for Māori cultural element of water resource relate to the other elements. Results indicate that people value all freshwater attributes considered here, with highest willingness to pay for environmental benefits followed by cultural, recreational and employment benefits. The preference ranking can provide useful information for prioritisation of Canterbury freshwater management objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Miller, Sini & Tait, Peter & Saunders, Caroline, 2013. "Scarcity Of Canterbury’s Water: Its Multiple, Conflicting Uses," 2013 Conference, August 28-30, 2013, Christchurch, New Zealand 160269, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:nzar13:160269
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/160269
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    References listed on IDEAS

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