IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/midips/107459.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

What Kind of Agricultural Strategies Lead to Broad-Based Growth: Implications For Country-Led Agricultural Investment Programs

Author

Listed:
  • Jayne, Thomas S.
  • Boughton, Duncan

Abstract

Without renewed attention to sustained agricultural productivity growth, most small farms in developing countries will become increasingly unviable economic and social units. Sustained agricultural productivity growth and poverty reduction will require progress on a number of fronts, most importantly increased public goods investments to agriculture; a policy environment that supports private investment in input, output, and financial markets and provision of key support services; a more level global trade policy environment; supportive donor programs; and improved governance. Subsidies, if they are focused, appropriately conceived, effectively implemented, and temporary, can play a complementary role but should not – based on both the Asian and African evidence presented here – be seen as the primary engine of growth. Most of these challenges can be met through country-led agricultural investment strategies that mobilize the political will to adopt the policies and public investments which substantial evidence demonstrates have the greatest chances of 5 driving sustainable pro-poor agricultural growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayne, Thomas S. & Boughton, Duncan, 2011. "What Kind of Agricultural Strategies Lead to Broad-Based Growth: Implications For Country-Led Agricultural Investment Programs," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 107459, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midips:107459
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/107459
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dorosh, Paul A. & Dradri, Simon & Haggblade, Steven, 2009. "Regional trade, government policy and food security: Recent evidence from Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 350-366, August.
    2. Stefan Dercon & Daniel O. Gilligan & John Hoddinott & Tassew Woldehanna, 2009. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension and Roads on Poverty and Consumption Growth in Fifteen Ethiopian Villages," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1007-1021.
    3. Minde, I., 2008. "Promoting fertilizer use in Africa: current issues and empirical evidence from Malawi, Zambia and Kenya," IWMI Working Papers H042064, International Water Management Institute.
    4. Minde, Isaac J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Crawford, Eric W. & Ariga, Joshua & Jones, Govereh, 2008. "Promoting Fertilizer Use in Africa: Current Issues and Empirical Evidence from Malawi, Zambia, and Kenya," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 54509, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Myers, Robert J. & Ferris, John N. & Mather, David & Sitko, Nicholas & Beaver, Margaret & Lenski, Natalie & Chapoto, Antony & Boughton, Duncan, 2010. "Patterns and Trends in Food Staples Markets in Eastern and Southern Africa: Toward the Identification of Priority Investments and Strategies for Developing Markets and Promoting Smallholder Productivi," Food Security International Development Working Papers 62148, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Étienne Gilbert, 1975. "B. F. Johnston, P. Kilby, Agriculture and structural transformation, economic strategies in late developing countries," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 16(63), pages 699-699.
    7. Haggblade, Steven & Tembo, Gelson, 2003. "Conservation farming in Zambia:," EPTD discussion papers 108, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:midips:107459. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/damsuus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.