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Economic Factors and Policies Encouraging Environmentally Detrimental Land Use Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Ehui, Simeon K.
  • Williams, Timothy
  • Swallow, Brent

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Ehui, Simeon K. & Williams, Timothy & Swallow, Brent, 1995. "Economic Factors and Policies Encouraging Environmentally Detrimental Land Use Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa," 1994 Conference, August 22-29, 1994, Harare, Zimbabwe 183404, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae94:183404
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/183404/files/IAAE-CONF-402.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Larson, Bruce A. & Bromely, Daniel W., 1991. "Natural resources prices, export policies, and deforestation: The case of sudan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 19(10), pages 1289-1297, October.
    2. Webb, Patrick & von Braun, Joachim & Yohannes, Yisehac, 1992. "Famine in Ethiopia: policy implications of coping failure at national and household levels," Research reports 92, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Douglas Southgate & John Sanders & Simeon Ehui, 1990. "Resource Degradation in Africa and Latin America: Population Pressure, Policies, and Property Arrangements," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1259-1263.
    4. Williams, Timothy O., 1993. "Livestock pricing policy in sub-Saharan Africa: Objectives, instruments and impact in five countries," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 8(2), pages 139-159, February.
    5. Wilson, Paul N & Thompson, Gary D, 1993. "Common Property and Uncertainty: Compensating Coalitions by Mexico's Patoral Ejidatarios," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(2), pages 299-318, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Templeton, Scott R. & Scherr, Sara J., 1999. "Effects of Demographic and Related Microeconomic Change on Land Quality in Hills and Mountains of Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 903-918, June.
    2. Templeton, Scott R. & Scherr, Sara J., 1997. "Population pressure and the microeconomy of land management in hills and mountains of developing countries:," EPTD discussion papers 26, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

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