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Influence of Geographical Elements on Tea Farmers' Participation in Modern Agricultural Value Chain

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  • Xiaorong, Z.
  • Yumeng, W.
  • Xiangzhi, K.

Abstract

China is the largest producer of tea in the world. In recent years, the primary activities and support activities of the Chinese tea value chain have undergone changes, such as the higher demand for raw materials with strict quality standards, the diversification of procurement methods and the cross-regionalization of procurement. Small farmers face more serious difficulties, such as financing problem, production input problem, lack of market information and so on. These problems make it easier for them to be squeezed out of the market, and the status of farmers in the market would be lower than before. In this paper, we draw on data from tea farmers in northern, eastern and southern Fujian Province China in July 2017. We found that the participation of tea farmers in the value chain helps to increase their economic performance. And tea farmers participate in different value chain organizations to different extent to their economic performance. Among them, only the participation of tea growers is more conducive to increase their economic performance than joining and setting up the tea value chain organization; tea growers join enterprises more favorably and increase their economic performance than joining cooperatives. Acknowledgement : We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China No.71361140369.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaorong, Z. & Yumeng, W. & Xiangzhi, K., 2018. "Influence of Geographical Elements on Tea Farmers' Participation in Modern Agricultural Value Chain," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277292, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:277292
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.277292
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