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Public-private partnerships and collective action in high value fruit and vegetable supply chains

Author

Listed:
  • Narrod, Clare
  • Roy, Devesh
  • Okello, Julius
  • Avendaño, Belem
  • Rich, Karl
  • Thorat, Amit

Abstract

Accessing developed country food markets entails meeting stringent food safety requirements. Food retailers impose protocols relating to pesticide residues, field and pack house operations, and traceability. To enable smallholders to remain competitive in such a system, new institutional arrangements are required. In particular, public-private partnerships can play a key role in creating farm to fork linkages that can satisfy market demands for food safety, while retaining smallholders in the supply chain. Furthermore, organized producer groups monitoring their own food safety standards through collective action often become attractive to buyers who are looking for ways to ensure traceability and reduce transaction costs. This paper compares the ways in which small producers of fruits and vegetables in Kenya and India have coped with increased demands for food safety from their main export markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Narrod, Clare & Roy, Devesh & Okello, Julius & Avendaño, Belem & Rich, Karl & Thorat, Amit, 2009. "Public-private partnerships and collective action in high value fruit and vegetable supply chains," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 8-15, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:34:y:2009:i:1:p:8-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. C. Dolan & J. Humphrey, 2000. "Governance and Trade in Fresh Vegetables: The Impact of UK Supermarkets on the African Horticulture Industry," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 147-176.
    2. Chowdhury, Shyamal & Gulati, Ashok & Gumbira-Sa'id, E., 2005. "High value products, supermarkets and vertical arrangements in Indonesia," MTID discussion papers 83, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Okello, Julius Juma & Narrod, Clare & Roy, Devesh, 2007. "Food safety requirements in African green bean exports and their impact on small farmers:," IFPRI discussion papers 737, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. David Boselie & Spencer Henson & Dave Weatherspoon, 2003. "Supermarket Procurement Practices in Developing Countries: Redefining the Roles of the Public and Private Sectors," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1155-1161.
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